Events

SURE Poster Fair & Celebration

The 2022 SURE Poster Fair & Celebration is almost here! Join us and learn about all the exciting research our first and second year engineering students have conducted.

Our 2002 Poster Fair was a big success!

Thank you to all of our students and to everyone who took part.

2022 SURE participants and projects

View all of the student projects below, or filter projects by department/major.

All Chemical and Biological Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering Mechanical Engineering School of Biomedical Engineering Systems Engineering
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3D Printed Bone Project

Elijah Jackson
Critical bone defects are characterized as injuries or conditions which affect the bone to such a degree that it can not spontaneously heal the area itself or by simple surgical stabilization. It is to such a degree that it requires further repair, which usually consists of an autologous bone graft or even amputation of the limb. Traditional implants can come with a myriad of unwanted side effects and amputation is less than ideal. The purpose of this lab is to develop scaffolds on which the bone can grow, that are bioactive enough and strong enough to allow for bone regeneration and reduce the number of procedures necessary to heal the critical area
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
David Prawel
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3D Printed Fischer Koch Bone Scaffolds

Bella Kaze
Tissue engineering is a hot topic in the current biomedical engineering field. This research project focuses on bone regeneration in large dogs suffering from bone cancer. Previously, dogs had to have their cancerous leg amputated, depreciating their quality of life. Our goal is to allow for the removal of the cancerous bone without the removal of the whole limb. We are designing a device that will regenerate healthy bone in replacement of the removed cancerous portion, so that no dog has to lose its leg to cancer again.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
David Prawel
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Algae Photobioreactor

Brianna Stanley
Currently, using cultures of cyanobacteria and algae has proven to produce a gaseous product containing hydrocarbons. This product could be utilized in various ways- one of the more notable being fuel. The process and design of such a production is being explored in hopes of finding an efficient and catalyzed method of being able to produce these many different chemicals from CO2 with a reduced water consumption. The biggest part of this research at the moment is finding optimized processes of growing and sustaining the cyanobacteria and algae. This is done with the hope that the production of these various chemicals can be both sustainable and economic.
Department:
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Ken Reardon, Xingfeng Huang
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Automated Testing of Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuits

Joseph Thompson
Silicon photonic integrated circuits (PICs) are emerging in different application domains from datacenter transceivers (i.e., Datacom) to integrated photonic neural networks (i.e., optical computing). A critical requirement after designing and fabricating a PIC is to be able to precisely test and characterize a large number of devices that are integrated on the PIC. In particular, an automated testing solution can help characterize thousands of devices without the need for manual calibrations while also preventing errors due to human interaction during the test process. This project focuses on the development and improvement of an automated testing station in the electronic-photonic system design (ECSyD) laboratory at CSU. The project requires developing a Python software package to interact with different pieces of the testing equipment to precisely test multiple devices on a PIC, and then process the characterization data.
Department:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Mahdi Nikdast
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Cell interaction with nanomaterials for medical device applications

Richard Morales-Villalva
In this project, over many years many researchers in the medical industry have tried to find materials for implants that not only are safer but also better than the ones already in the market, the aim is to make biomaterials that are safer and more effective for implants and in this research project a surface modification strategy using natural biopolymers on titanium is proposed to improve bone healing and promote rapid and successful osseointegration of orthopedic implants.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Ketul Popat
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Chamber Experiments for Air Quality Research

Lindsay Dietz
As the fifth ranking human health risk factor, air pollution has a profound effect on people and the environment. Volatile Chemical Products (VCPs), which can be found in an array of products from pesticides to personal care items, represent an under-researched source of pollution. In the atmosphere, VCPs can interact with sunlight and other pollutants to form secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) and fine particles and contribute considerably to ozone pollution. Despite their significant impact on air quality, relatively little is known about the chemical behavior of VCPs in the atmosphere. These experiments seek to observe how VCPs influence air quality and provide new data that can shape our understanding of how these products affect human and environmental welfare.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Shantanu Jathar
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Co-digestion Capacity Assessment and Optimization of Agricultural Feedstocks in Municipal Wastewater Treatment Systems

Jayden Galindo
With lack of investment and interest in current renewable sources, a new perspective of bioenergy development is being analyzed within wastewater. The aim of this research project is to assess agricultural feedstock co-digestion to produce bioenergy from wastewater treatment plants.
Department:
Department of Systems Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Steve Conrad
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Computational Fluid Dynamics and Propulsion

Hayden Filsinger
The primary goal of the computational fluid dynamics and propulsion project that I am working on is to simulate the combustion of various fuels inside a simulated chamber passing over a bluff body and measuring multiple variables of the resulting flow for use by the U.S. Airforce to predict these outcomes in their prototypical technology.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Xinfeng Gao
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Cost Modeling of Hydrokinetic Turbines

Derrick Hayward
In recent years the world has started to lean towards renewable energy systems. This has caused companies to expand their options from just wind and solar energy and look for ways they can utilize ocean currents, ocean waves, and river currents for their energy production systems. This project is going to outline and model the costs of a Horizontal Axial Hydrokinetic Turbine giving detail into the return on investment and power production relative to the location that was chosen by the team.
Department:
Department of Systems Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Daniel Herber
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Crash Reconstruction through Digital Forensics of Vehicle Event Data Recorders

Carson Green
Event data recorders (EDR) are used in many vehicles in order to log technical vehicle data such as velocity, deceleration, whether or not the driver was buckled, and more information regarding the vehicle’s performance during a crash. The scope of this research is to gain more insight into methods used to retrieve EDR data through extraction/decryption, chip swapping, and the usage of the Bosch Crash Data Retrieval Tool; which can be useful for crash reconstruction as it may provide evidence in legal proceedings.
Department:
Department of Systems Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Jeremy Daily
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Directed Evolution of E coli to Increase the Production of Trans-Cinnamic Acid

Hayley Stern
Traditional diesel and airplane fuels are both unsustainable to produce and create harmful byproducts when used, however, one major drawback of biofuels is it is difficult to match the performance without aromatic properties. We are engineering E. coli to produce trans-cinnamic acid, a chemical intermediate that can be converted to fuels and other chemicals. We are using a directed evolution approach to improve trans-cinnamic acid productivity. Chemical mutagenesis combined with growth on 4-fluorophenylalanine, a toxic analog of phenylalanine, will allow us to select for mutants that produce more phenylalanine which should translate to increased trans-cinnamic acid production.
Department:
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Christie Peebles
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Efficiency in Combustion engines

Aung Tun
There has always been course of advancement in technology. The aim of this research is to find the optimal combustion rate for engines to run at full efficiency. This will allow for better performance with lower cost.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Daniel Olsen
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Electro-Stimulated Fermentation

Mariana Sauceda
Fermentation is a process used in all types of industries (agricultural, food, pharmaceutical, etc.) and so, creates a variety of products. The oxidation state of those products depends on the necessity for redox balance and the reducing power of the substrate. More oxidized products include CO2, less favored, while more reduced products include alcohols, more favored. To make these favored products, we need to bring more electrons into the process. The focus of this project is to study electro-fermentation and find how we can give more electrons to the cells. Not all cells are electroactive, meaning not all respond to electrical stimuli, so we need to study which species have the ability to transfer electrons. This transfer of loose electrons is known as extracellular electron transfer. Because this is a new field of study, there are some bacteria that have been heavily studied and others we do not know much about yet. This project is mainly focusing on a lesser studied bacterium, clostridium pasteurianum, and researching its extracellular electron transfer mechanisms. If the experiments are successful, clostridium pasteurianum is electroactive and can transfer electrons, and that leads to a greater yield of more favored products in fermentation processes.
Department:
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Ken Reardon, Danielle Bartholet
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Electrospinning Polydiacetylene Nanofiber to Act as a Biosensor

Emma Goodall
Currently, very few easily accessible and utilized fibers are able to act as a biosensor. This project aims to advance research done on the nanofiber PU-PDA and how it is able to act as a biosensor. When utilized in an electrospinning machine and photopolymerized, PU-PDA produces a blue nanofiber. The electrospinning machine uses a high voltage to spin barely visible fibers of a PU-PDA solution. The fiber is photopolymerized using UV light. From here, we are looking at what occurs when the PU-PDA nanofiber comes in contact with different bacteria. When placed with gram-negative bacteria, the biosensor turns red. At the moment, further research is being conducted on the effect of gram-positive bacteria. In the future, it is hoped that this colorimetric change could be used as a medical alert, in cases such as infections or viruses.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Ketul Popat
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Equity and Sustainability in Engineering

Delaney Dunlop
Low income and minority groups are disproportionately affected by climate change, and the adverse affects of climate change that that these communities face have only gotten worse.The aim of this project is to measure and analyze how civil engineering companies measure, practice, and model sustainability and potentially redefine the engineering process.
Department:
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Rebecca Atadero
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High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data Pipeline for Per-and poly-fluoroalkyl Substances and Produced Water

Andy Quach
This project seeks to develop analytical pipelines for processing high-resolution mass spectrometry data for environmental samples. Specifically, this project includes the detailed analysis of persistent and toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), in aqueous film-forming foam historically used in firefighting, as well as organic constituents of oil and gas produced water. Here, the analytical pipeline was developed for environmental data obtained using liquid chromatograph coupled to a quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry system (LC-QToF). The aim of the pipeline development is to create standardized procedures for LC-QToF data analysis for the identification of organic constituents in environmental matrices to aid in impacted water treatment.
Department:
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Andrea Hanson Rhoades
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How Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Impacts Mammalian Cells

Haylee Smith
Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) is a zoonotic arbovirus that is transmitted in animals through insect bites, causing severe diseases in cattle, horses, and swine. The VSV virus can infect humans, but the symptoms are mild and occur rarely. The virus has a relatively simple structure and efficiently incorporates foreign transmembrane proteins, making it an attractive platform for vaccine vector development. The aim of this research project is to demonstrate that stochastic models are a good framework to predict phenotype to genotype.
Department:
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Jean Peccoud
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Hydro-Urban Bhaskar Research (HUB)

Danielle Lewis
Urbanization can often cause harm to stream health, which can lead to water quality issues. The method of research regarding this issue is analyzing the hydraulic response range lands before and after development. We are currently taking photos of the WestStroh Watershed in Parker Colorado and monitoring for presence or absence of flow in a channel.
Department:
Environmental Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Aditi Bhaskar
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Hydrogels

Jevannah Vigil
Hydrogels are highly adaptable biomedical materials that can be used as drug, cell, and/or active molecule delivery systems. Working under Dr. McGilvray at the Orthopedic Bioengineering Research Laboratory, I have been assigned to select a bioresorbable hydrogel that can be used to aid in the repair of torn and/or degenerated rotator cuffs. The specific aims of my research are to select a bioresorbable hydrogel that can be used to augment a structural tendon repair scaffold; one that has a known and controllable “drug” release profile. I will test the selected hydrogel to ascertain its manufacturing protocols, tensile mechanical properties, degradation profile, and “drug” elusion rates. The results from these works will ultimately lead to the development of a bioactive scaffold to improve rotator cuff healing.
Department:
Orthopedic Bioengineering Research Lab
Faculty Mentor:
Kirk McGilvrey
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Mask Leakage Quantification

James Berg
The current OSHA fit-test protocols for masks and respirators require the employer to perform a total of 8 various quantitative and qualitative tests using unpleasant chemicals which take hours and thousands of dollars to complete. The method of leakage testing evaluated in this research would reduce the cost to a simple $20 circuit and 20 minutes to an hour of the test subject's time.
Department:
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Christian L'Orange
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Measurements of the 3-Component Dynamic Displacement of Full-Scale structures using an Unmanned Aerial System

Ashley Gurrola
The monitoring of structural health can enable prevention methods for potential hazardous damage. The aim of this research is to facilitate the collection of 3-component displacement measurements of structures, by optimizing the technique for data collection, it will allow an easier implementation of unmanned arial systems containing optical sensors.
Department:
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Yanlin Guo
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Microfluidic Devices and Biomolecular Crystal Growth

Brinn Thomas
Working in Snow Labs at CSU I was able to work with biomolecular crystal growth and simple microfluidic device fabrication. The goal of this project is to develop porous crystals that would act as a scaffold for nucleic acids and proteins. In this research project we used CJ protein as a way to produce crystal growth. Microfluidic devices act as a way for us to get images of the extremely tiny crystals. The end goal of this research is to be able to use the CJ crystals to scavenge for viruses within the body.
Department:
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Christopher Snow
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Microfluidic tissue on chip device

Michelle Sanjuan
Humans like most things are not perfect; being so people have many problems from physical to mental they must over come. One such problems are imbalances in the microbial communities of the gastrointestinal tract. These imbalances lead to tissue disease in the intestine; like inflammatory bowel disease. We use a microfludic organotypic device (MOD) to hold intact intestinal tissue; which contains muscular, neural, immune, and epithelial components. The overall goal of the project is to maintain the function of the tissue within the MOD to gain a better understanding of the gastrointestinal tract.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Stuart Tobet
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Microwave Radiometers

Anna Biolchini
The Microwave Systems Laboratory has several different instruments that are able to measure the planetary boundary by taking measurements of the atmosphere using multiple microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies. The aim of this research project is to create code that is able to utilize the microwave channels’ measurements taken by the HAMMR (High-frequency Airborne Microwave and Millimeter-wave Radiometer), and create accurate plots of the brightness temperature. Another goal for this research project is to take tipping curve measurements of the older instrument, CMR-H (Compact Microwave Radiometer for Humidity Profiling).
Department:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Steven Reising
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NASA’s Operational Precipitation Product

Isai Garcia Zamora
In order to predict weather forecasts and perform climate modeling, extensive computations have to be made to guarantee validity in the results. The aim of this project is to document a Machine Learning (ML) algorithm for NASA’s operational precipitation product to make it reproducible on different machines and for different spaceborne sensors. A faster algorithm will provide global precipitation measurements with improved accuracy, coverage and dynamic range for studying precipitation characteristics.
Department:
Computer Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Christian Kummerow
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Natural Source Zone Depletion Measurements Using Sensors

Emma Schmit
In the face of climate change and drastically changing environments, water has become a declining resource. Several states face water shortages and droughts in the western United States. Groundwater is a vital water resource for the current and upcoming challenges resulting from climate change and is an essential part of our environment. Gasoline, oil, and chemicals are all significant groundwater contaminants; there are several different cleaning methods of groundwater remediation; however, these methods are either costly and/or a long process. Natural source zone depletion (NSZD) is currently a favorable, inexpensive way of treating groundwater contamination – naturally occurring processes that break down contaminants. This project is part of ongoing projects to find an effective way to measure natural groundwater remediation; many limitations impact the measurement of these rates. Currently, the project uses sensors to measure thermal fluxes from specific groundwater contaminants (LNAPL contaminants) during NSZD to estimate NSZD rates. The project demonstrates the application of digital sensors in managing contaminated sites.
Department:
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Kayvan Karimi Askarani
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Performance Characterization of Polyoxymethylene Ether (POMEs) Blends in Compression Ignition Engines

Bryson Arnott
Oxymethylene dimethyl ethers (OMEs) are well known to reduce the formation of particulate emissions in compression ignition engines but are seen as impractical diesel fuel additives given their high water solubility and low energy densities. Fuel additive suitability can be improved by exchanging the methyl groups which terminate the OME molecules with higher order alkyls, forming polyoxymethylene ethers (POMEs), but little research has been done focused on POME performance in compression ignition engines. This project centers on testing in-house synthesized and distilled POME blends in a fully instrumented 4.5 L 4-cylinder John Deere 4045 turbodiesel engine. Tests were carried out with a baseline certificate diesel (2007 spec.) along with the POMEs butylal and propylal in their pure states and in 30% by volume blends with the baseline fuel. The engine was operated at steady state according to Mode 4 of ISO 8178 (50% torque at intermediate speed) – Test Cycle Type A. General engine performance was characterized using both low and high-speed data acquisition systems, along with detailed analysis of the cylinder-out gaseous and particulate emissions.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Bret Windom
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Physical and chemical properties of tailing dam

Gisel Rueda Perez
On our way to becoming more sustainable, we have been relying more on minerals extracted from mining. Due to this we must extract vast volumes of rocks, grind them into fine material and only then extract the minerals of value. Tailings are created as the result of mining. They are similar to chocolate milk rather than rocks that are stored behind dams. These must be managed to prevent physical and chemical failures. The proposed project would be looking at how the physical and chemical properties of tailing affect how the dams withstand and if they can withstand human activities.
Department:
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Joseph Scalia
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Polyoxymethylene Ethers (POMEs) as a High Cetane, Low Suting Biofuel Blend Stock for use in MCCI Engines

Wyatt Wolff
In the coming years, there is still a continuous growth in petroleum fuel consumption, especially from heavy freight. The engines found in these heavy-duty freights create an undesirable number of pollutants that pollute our ecosystems and have been found to cause health issues in people. The mission of our research is to create biofuels that will reduce carbon emissions and aim to enhance engine efficiency.
Department:
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Brett Windom
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Power Optimization of Wave Energy Converters

Aidan Briggs
Renewable energy sources have received an increasing amount of attention in recent years as climate change threats grow and nonrenewable energy sources face depletion. One such example is wave energy, which can be captured using wave energy converters (WECs). WECs convert energy in ocean wave into power that can be harnessed and utilized for practical purposes. The goal of this research project is to better understand how WECs work and how WECs in wave farm can be best placed in relation to one another in order to optimize the amount of power generated. Numerical models of WEC array will be built and used to predict and optimize their power generation.
Department:
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Gaofeng Jia
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PRCI

Christian Kolset
Ever since fossil fuel have been used as an energy source, engineers and manufacturers have been striving for designs that can produce more energy, effectively. Essentially decreasing the amount of pollution emitted. The aim of this research project is to design a pre-combustion chamber that will maximize the fuel efficiency during combustion and thus, making it more environmentally friendly.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Daniel Olsen
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Reducing the Puff from Burning Wood

Abdulaziz Alali
Our research is on the effects of burning wood, specifically, on the smoke that comes out. The smoke that results from burning wood is harmful to living beings as it suffocates us and can result in death. Smoke also causes pollution. The purpose of our research is to limit the amount of smoke that is emitted when burning wood. We focus on the early stages of burning, called pyrolysis, in which wood starts heating up and puffs smoke, but does not ignite yet. This stage produces the most amount of smoke when burning wood, so we do research on this stage specifically, in order to minimize the effects of pyrolysis and initiate the ignition phase faster. We conduct research by monitoring mass change in wood during pyrolysis, and estimating the mass loss rate, which is directly related to smoke emission. We experiment on different kinds of wood, under different temperatures.
Department:
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Tami Bond
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Solar Cell Manufacturing Using CdTe PV Devices

Rosa Dang
In recent years, climate change has become a prevalent issue on a global scale. One of the many reasons why it became a crisis is due to the usage of fossil fuels for energy. To combat this, reusable energy became a subject of research. This research project focuses on the development of solar cells and how to make them more efficient. To do so, this project experiments on different recipes for the materials in the solar cells to discover the optimal amount of the different metals.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Walajabad Sampath
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Thermal Desorption of Nitroaromatic Compounds

Aimee Nicodemus
Nitroaromatic compounds are acutely toxic and often carcinogenic substances that exist in our soil and water. Although there are some nitroaromatic compounds found in nature, the vast majority are synthetic. These compounds are dangerous to living creatures, including humans. The aim of my research project is to find an effective way to quantify nitroaromatic compounds in the gas phase using thermal desorption techniques.
Department:
Environmental Engineering
Faculty Mentor:
Jens Blotevogel