Walter Scott, Jr. College of Engineering

E-Days

Engineering Days: Project presentations

Biomedical Engineering

Our senior design projects cover a wealth of fascinating engineering and science research. Each project features information about the research, a poster presentation, and a video.

Projects

Computational Modeling of SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Humans

Students:

Patrick Charlton, Hannah Mabry, Stuart McKnight, Trevor Woodruff
A computational model of the processes involved in the infection of human lung epithelial cells by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The model uses a large system of ordinary differential equations, based on chemical kinetics of infection steps, to determine the concentration of important proteins throughout the course of the infection. Important proteins involved with viral entry, viral replication, host immune response, host immune suppression, and viral release, can all be tracked throughout the course of the infection. Users will have the ability to manipulate individual steps in the infection process to simulate how different drugs and disease states may affect the progression of the infection.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering
Advisors:
Dr. Ashok Prasad

Low-Cost COVID-19 Tester

Students:

Katie Davis, Cerine Khoo, Megan Maier, Sean O' Connell, Faith Otieno
The need for a fast and inexpensive COVID-19 testing device is critical to reducing the high infection rates and mortality rates of COVID-19. The team is developing a proof of concept for a novel device using electronic sensing of volatile organic compounds in breath to rapidly diagnose COVID-19 at a low cost with high accuracy.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering,
Department of Electrical Engineering
Sponsors:
Neuvatek, Undergraduate Venture Fund for Entrepreneurial Senior Capstone Design Projects
Advisors:
Bert Vermeulen

Mobile Wheelchair Control Application

Students:

Katrina Lems, Chad Kennedy, Christina Croal, Ethan Lash
The WIT chair is a unique phone app to assist power chair users. The app displays the fluid level of the user's urine bag alongside a pressure map of their seat regardless of the orientation of the wheelchair. These two systems are used to alert the user to empty the urine bag and to shift off of pressure points to prevent pressure sores by reclining their chair. The phone app can be used by caretakers or wheelchair users for maximum convenience.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Department of Electrical Engineering
Sponsors:
Undergraduate Venture Fund for Entrepreneurial Senior Capstone Design Projects
Advisors:
Dr. Sam Bechara, Noel Marshall

Mosquito Microcrystal Self-Marking Device

Students:

Jorge Arriaga, Jordan Fox, Dezmond Jeans, Lexia Wyse
A device designed to self-mark mosquitoes used in unison with a previously developed DNA-rich microcrystal solution for mark-release-recaputre in the analysis of epidemiologically significant data.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering,
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Advisors:
Dr. Christopher Snow, Dr. Rebekah Kading

Overuse Tendinopathy Device

Students:

Greta Gohring, Sarah Burke, Alfredo Macha, Alfredo McAuliffe
The Overuse Tendinopathy Device is a unique tool that will be used to induce tendon-specific injuries in mice. As the first of its kind, this device will utilize cyclic loading to mimic Achilles tendon overuse in a realistic and time-effective manner. Once integrated into research practices, this device will provide scientists with a reliable method to create injury models for experimentation of different therapeutic techniques. Current methods to treat tendon disorders are preventative and with more testing of these therapeutic methods, there is the potential to help revert the damage in patients.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering,
Department of Electrical Engineering
Advisors:
Dr. Katie Sikes

Pediatric Spine Clamp

Students:

Meghan Morrill, Logan Farrand, Kim Fernandez, Elise Ng
The StealthStation surgical navigation system allows surgeons to see where their instruments are in real time relative to a patient's anatomy, increasing the surgeon's accuracy and precision while performing the surgery. The titanium reference frame clamp, which is critical to the system's function, needs to be redesigned to better suit pediatric patients in order to provide the best patient care and outcomes. The titanium clamp must remain stable on the human spine and provide accurate instrumentation locations.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Medtronic
Advisors:
Jeff Schwamb

Quatro Socket

Students:

Emma MacLaughlin, Logan Munson, Avi Nataf, Jack Fleischmann
Volume change in the residual limb is a common obstacle amputees face during their use of prosthetics. Quorum Prosthetics has patented a prosthetic socket that aims to provide a more comfortable fit for users by accounting for daily volume changes in the amputee’s residual limb. The Quatro Socket allows users to alter the volume and compression of the device through compression panels controlled by Revofit dials. This allows individuals to adjust the compression on the residual limb for a more comfortable and secure fit. The main challenge the senior design team will face while working on the Quatro Socket is quantifying comfort to back up the anecdotal evidence that this socket design is more comfortable than other designs currently on the market. The senior design team seeks to provide quantitative data that will support the comfort claims made by Quorum Prosthetics. This will be done by creating a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model of the Quatro Socket and validating this model through benchtop experiments. This analysis will provide quantitative data that will aid in the design of future Quatro Sockets in order to minimize the wear of the socket, respective components, deterioration of collateral tissues and maximize efficiency.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering,
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Quorum Prosthetics
Advisors:
Dr. Kirk McGilvray

Rapid Paper-Based COVID-19 Test

Students:

Al Watson, Jackie Poirot, Alyssa Caldwell-McGee, Mallory Knudsen, Katie Gaughan, Erin Estrada, Sarah Easton
This COVID-19 diagnostic test was designed to detect viral RNA rapidly, at a low cost without need for laboratory equipment. The paper-based, cell free assay uses saliva, collected with non-invasive procedures, in combination with a protein cascade to produce a colorimetric, visible signal when COVID-19 RNA is present in the sample. The paper-based design allows for use of this tool in areas without access to chemical reagents and for self administration. Without additional components, the cost of the test is minimized, allowing for mass production and swift distribution.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering,
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Advisors:
Dr. Christie Peebles, Dr. Claudia Gentry-Weeks

Real-Time Augmented Reality Ultrasound Display System

Students:

Diana Boll, Benjamin Farkas, Steven Hsu, Janaye Matthews
Developing a Real-Time Augmented Reality (AR) ultrasound display system allows for the overlay of supplemental data directly with the sensory input of the practitioner, bringing them real-time information to aid in their understanding and to treat their patients effectively This would greatly enhance the operator's ability to effectively interpret ultrasound imaging in educational, training, and clinical settings.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Department of Electrical Engineering
Sponsors:
Undergraduate Venture Fund for Entrepreneurial Senior Capstone Design Projects
Advisors:
Dr. Tod Clapp, Chad Eitel, Jordan Nelson, Brendan Garbe, Dr. Stu Tobet

Terumo BCT Quantum Cell Expansion System Scale-Up

Students:

Josh Cook, Kiersten Allen, Michelle Bailey, Nate Haswell, Clark Yarbrough
Terumo BCT manufactures a hollow-fiber bioreactor device called the Quantum Cell Expansion System which excels in culturing adherent type cells. It has wide uses in academic research, as well as in medical applications where it is used fabricate immunotherapies for the treatment of hematological cancers using the Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Treatment. Our team aims to scale up the current Quantum System by 5 to 10 times in order to facilitate a more efficient generation of immunotherapies. We are also adding 5 new biosensors to improve usability and promote automated control throughout the cell expansion process. We hope these addtions will increase the marketability of the Quantum System, and reduce the burden of blood-based cancer on patients in the future.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering,
Department of Electrical Engineering
Sponsors:
Terumo BCT
Advisors:
Jeremy Kolenbrander

Training Device for Upper Right Lobectomy via Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery

Students:

Jacob Stewart, Sandra Witta, Grace VanOrman, Kalley Harriss
Our team is designing a training device for surgeons to learn and practice the key steps of an upper right lobectomy via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). We are designing and 3D printing molds for the various components that will be used in conjunction with silicones and foams to mimic real tissue properies.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering,
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Applied Medical
Advisors:
Dr. Michael Stanton, Greg Hofstetter

Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation Device

Students:

Sainandan Gowdar, Emily Hoffmann, Gabriel Perez, Dillon Roach, Tracey Wick
The Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) device uses ultraviolet germicidal irradiation to disinfect N95 masks so that hospitals can re-use them, meeting a critical need during periods of PPE shortage. This device represents an improvement from similar devices on the market with its programmable disinfection cycles, continuous irradiation monitoring, and ability to track how many disinfection cycles a mask has undergone. It has the capacity to disinfect additional objects such as tablets, and may also be implemented in other healthcare and commercial settings.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering,
Department of Electrical Engineering
Sponsors:
Three Bean Industrial
Advisors:
Dr. Julie Dunn, Dr. David Prawel, Dr. Thomas Warne

Wireless Smart Junctional Tourniquet

Students:

Logan Blakeslee, Rachel Keating, Camille Milo, Sydney Sherrick
The Wireless Smart Junctional Tourniquet (WSJT) is an addition to the SAM junctional tourniquet targeted for use in the combat field. These additions include a count-up timer capable of timing for up to 6 hours and blood pressure data. Once the device is started, patient blood pressure is collected and can be transmitted wirelessly via Bluetooth to clinicians upon arrival at a hospital or clinic. The aim behind this project is to create a tourniquet that answers critical questions for clinicians upon the arrival of a hemorrhagic patient so that clinical decisions can be made quickly and be backed by real-time data.
Department:
School of Biomedical Engineering,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering
Sponsors:
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R25EB025791
Advisors:
Dr. Matt Baretich, Damien Berg