Walter Scott, Jr. College of Engineering

Undergraduate Programs

Undergraduate Programs

At CSU, graduates of the biomedical engineering (BME) program receive two degrees: one B.S. in biomedical engineering and the other B.S. in one of the three traditional engineering areas:

Chemical & Biological Engineering (CBE)
Electrical Engineering (EE)
Mechanical Engineering (MECH)

Biomedical engineering

Chemical and biological engineering (CBE)

Biomedical engineering

Electrical engineering (EE)

Biomedical engineering

Mechanical engineering (MECH)

Biomedical Engineering (BME)

Biomedical engineers work at the interface of biology, medicine, and engineering to help solve problems in human and animal health. As the first bachelor’s program in the state of Colorado, CSU pioneered education efforts in this growing area.

Graduates of the program are more competitive for positions in the biomedical engineering industry, one of the fastest growing industries in the United States. Biomedical engineers combine engineering principles with medical sciences to design and create equipment, devices, computer systems, and software.

At CSU, you will integrate the breadth of a biomedical engineering degree and depth of a traditional engineering degree in five years. You develop and use transdisciplinary skills in classroom, laboratory, internship, and senior design experiences. Below, explore the three pathways to discover which one is right for you.

Are you planning to major in math, biology, chemistry or some other science but would still like to earn a credential in biomedical engineering? Learn more about our BME minor, which is open to all majors including any engineering discipline.

Which pathway is right for you?

Biomedical Engineering + Chemical and Biological Engineering (BME+CBE)

Potential Occupations

The BME+CBE pathway will enable you to develop or improve therapies for fighting cancer, tuberculosis, or other illnesses and diseases (e.g., nanoscaffolding for localized chemotherapy delivery, telemetric sensors to determine healing rates in bone fractures or to detect key chemicals in live tissue with high temporal and spatial resolution).

Snapshot – Percentage breakdown of courses

Math
12%
Natural Science
27%
Engineering
28%
Biomedical
15%
General Ed
13%
Tech Electives
5%
Male student in laboratory using pipette.

Critical Skills & Abilities

In addition to the important qualities required of a biomedical engineer (creativity as well as analytical, communication, math, and problem-solving skills), chemical and biological engineers need:

Ingenuity

When faced with a production problem, for example, chemical engineers must apply creative and resourceful thinking to work through the problem.

Interpersonal skills

Working with teams, it is critical for chemical engineers to communicate and relate to others. Developing strong conflict management, listening, and negotiating skills will help in the workplace.

Job Outlook

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of biomedical engineers is projected to grow 4% from 2018 to 2028, about as fast as the average of all occupations. However, employment of chemical engineers is projected to grow 6% from 2018 to 2028.

Occupational Outlook Handbook

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics - Chemical Engineers

Biomedical Engineering + Electrical Engineering (EE)

Snapshot – Percentage breakdown of courses

Math
12%
Natural Science
22%
Engineering
38%
Biomedical
11%
General Ed
13%
Tech Electives
4%

Potential Occupations

The BME+EE pathway will enable you to develop or design better ways to image and/or diagnose illnesses. For example, using laser-based imaging to detect viruses, developing ways to increase electrical signals to detect threats to food safety and security, designing biosensors to diagnose cancer cells, or developing software to determine toxic pesticide levels in people. You might also design medical instruments including MRI, ultrasound, or x-ray machines.

Critical Skills & Abilities

In addition to the important qualities required of a biomedical engineer (creativity as well as analytical, communication, math, and problem-solving skills), electrical engineers need:

Concentration

When designing and developing complex electrical systems, electrical engineers must keep track of multiple design elements and technical characteristics when performing these tasks.

Initiative

Keeping up with the latest changes in the industry is an critical element for electrical engineers. They must  apply their new knowledge to the  project they undertake.

Interpersonal Skills

Electrical engineers must collaborate with others to ensure that their plans are implemented correctly. This may include keeping a group “on track” and moving toward the completion of a project or interacting effectively with peers and supervisors.

Speaking skills

Electrical engineers work on complex projects with lots of detail and, often times, work closely with other engineers and technicians. They must be able to convey information or instructions clearly and effectively, not only to their peers, but also to customers who may not have the technical expertise.

Writing skills

The ability to write concisely is imperative for electrical engineers, as they often develop design methods documents, maintenance or operation manuals, parts lists, and product proposals related to equipment they develop.

Students with goggles in electrical laboratory.

Job Outlook

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of biomedical engineers is projected to grow 4% from 2018 to 2028, about as fast as the average of all occupations. However, employment of electrical engineers is projected to grow only 2% from 2018 to 2028.

Occupational Outlook Handbook

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics - Electrical Engineers

Biomedical Engineering + Mechanical Engineering (BME+MECH)

Potential Occupations

The BME+MECH pathway will enable you to design medical devices and equipment (e.g., pacemakers, assistive devices, artificial internal organs, replacement body parts, surgical tools, exercise equipment for astronauts)

Snapshot – Percentage breakdown of courses

Math
12%
Natural Science
21%
Engineering
36%
Biomedical
12%
General Ed
13%
Tech Electives
6%
CSU biomedical and mechanical engineering student Brooke Landoch works alongside David Krupa, ROMP co-founder and CEO, to modify a prosthetic device in a clinic in Quito, Ecuador. Photo courtesy Deb Misuraca

Critical Skills & Abilities

In addition to the important qualities required of a biomedical engineer (creativity as well as analytical, communication, math, and problem-solving skills), mechanical engineers need:

Listening skills

Listening skills are imperative to understand and analyze different ideas or approaches from other members of a team, such as architects and computer scientists. 

Mechanical skills

A mechanical engineer must be comfortable operating equipment and tools. They are adept at fixing things and intuitively see how things work. They apply basic engineering concepts and mechanical processes to the design of new devices and systems.

Job Outlook

According to the Labor of Bureau Statistics, employment of mechanical engineers is projected to grow 4% from 2018 to 2028, about as fast as the average for all occupations, and the same rate of growth as a biomedical engineer. However, because mechanical engineers can work in many industries, the growth rate will differ depending on the industry that employ them.

Occupational Outlook Handbook

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics - Mechanical Engineers