Walter Scott, Jr. College of Engineering

E-Days

E-DAYS 2022

E-Days 2022 - Mechanical Engineering

Senior Design and Senior Research Presentations & Posters

Engineering Days (E-Days) is a long-standing CSU tradition that allows senior undergraduate students the opportunity to showcase their senior design projects and senior practicum research. E-Days visitors include faculty, family, industry representatives, peers, and prospective students interested in exploring engineering.

This year, visitors can participate in person or virtually. The in person event will be held at the CSU Lory Student Center Plaza on April 22. To participate virtually, scroll down to view posters and learn more about the teams. 

For additional information, visit the Walter Scott, Jr. College of Engineering E-Days page.

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Projects

Projects

A Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Conventional and Local Outdoor Lettuce Production Systems

MECH 498 Research Practicum

Students:

Jenna Stubbers
Due to increasing food demand, food insecurity, and environmental concerns, there has been growing interest in local food production. These systems, such as greenhouses and local farmers markets, often claim to be more sustainable than conventional centralized agriculture. There is a common preconception that conventional agriculture has a high environmental impact from transportation emissions. However, other factors throughout the life cycle may outweigh transportation impacts depending on location. Through life cycle assessment methodology, the global warming potential (GWP) of conventional lettuce production in the Central Coast of California was calculated along with added transportation emissions to market, ranging from 0.37 to 1.22 kg CO2-eq/kg lettuce across the contiguous US. Local growth model results in a range of GWP between 0.36 to 1.60 kg CO2-eq/kg lettuce across the contiguous US. Location specific results show some tradeoffs between choosing local or conventional lettuce. In Fort Collins, CO, the GWP of local lettuce production is 0.43 kg CO2-eq/kg lettuce versus 0.68 kg CO2-eq/kg lettuce for conventional production. Alternatively, in Washington, DC, the GWP of local lettuce production is 0.41 kg CO2-eq/kg lettuce compared to 1.05 kg CO2-eq/kg lettuce for conventional lettuce production. However, water impacts show contrasting results. In Fort Collins, the water footprint is larger for local production versus conventional production, at 0.30 m3/kg lettuce and 0.07 m3/kg lettuce, respectively. In Washington, DC, the water footprint is smaller for local production compared to conventional production, resulting in values of 0.03 m3/kg lettuce and 0.10 m3/kg lettuce, respectively. The results suggest that GWP is heavily influenced by transportation emissions, whereas water impacts are affected predominantly by soil and rainfall variation. This research gives a regionalized understanding to comparative GWP and water impacts between local and conventional lettuce production systems.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
CSU InTERFEWS, NSF
Advisors:
Dr. Jason Quinn

Automated Medicated BAit delivery system

Project ID: 7

Students:

Kara Gustafson, Alexandra Palma, Triston Sorah, Ben Wilson
The presence of roundworm in racoons is rampant and in an effort to curb the transmission of this parasite, the implementation of a bait dispenser which would release medicated baits is being researched as a viable treatment option. The USDA-APHIS (Animal and Plant health inspection service) organization led by Tim Smyser, created a prototype that used a vertically stacked bait magazine combined with a plunger system that would dispense reliably a bait when the previous one was taken. This device was able to dispense an entire 45 bait magazine on a single battery charge but due to some oversight, additional problems were present. The purpose of our group is to create an updated prototype with additional features to be used in testing by the USDA-APHIS group. Some of the desired improvements are as follows: magazine size adjusted to match different sized baits, a reduction in the number of custom parts the dispenser requires, an improvement in the control of bait presence and a tracking system that will output data for use of the biologist researching this project.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Tim Smyser
Advisors:
Micheal Poland, Dr Wade Troxell

Balance of Plant Modeling of a Green Hydrogen Generation System

MECH 498 Research Practicum

Students:

Niko Landin
Renewable energy production methods such as wind and solar are available in a wide variety of locations but have an inherently intermittent nature on when they generate power. Energy storage will be important for large adoption of wind and solar technologies as grid demand must be met regardless of renewable energy output. Green hydrogen can be used as a method to chemically store renewable energy. This research proposes using a Balance of Plant model, created using the software Simulink, to optimize the system level efficiency and promote the use of green hydrogen generation systems at scale. Data from the Electric Reliability Council of Texas is used to investigate the transient behavior of a green hydrogen generation system.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Advisors:
Dr. Bret Windom

Bioadhesives for the Fixation and Loading of a Novel Intervertebral Disc Repair Patch

MECH 498 Research Practicum

Students:

Owen Wahl
Lower back pain is the leading cause of disabilities worldwide. Approximately 31 million Americans suffer from it at any given time, resulting in the loss of 264 million workdays annually and incurring $100 billion in costs each year. The Orthopaedic Bioengineering Research Laboratory is developing a novel, tissue engineered scaffold to replace current, palliative treatment methods. Integration of the repair patch into the intervertebral disc proves challenging using current surgical tools at our disposal. Bioadhesives, or biocompatible glues, offer a potential solution, as they may be applied easily and flexibly. Therefore, the objective of this research was to characterize various bioadhesives including fibrin glue variants and mussel-inspired bioadhesives. Lap shear testing was performed using combinations of ovine annulus fibrosus tissue samples and crosshatched, polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold strips. Using a prescribed protocol, ultimate adhesion strength, yield strength, and linear joint modulus were evaluated. The most effective fibrin glue was chosen for PCL plug pushout testing and compared to a cyanoacrylate baseline. Overall, bioadhesives tested were weak, failing to breach 100 kPa in strength. Adhesives demonstrated improved mechanical properties when binding scaffold joint combinations as compared to tissue joint combinations. The cyanoacrylate baseline withstood a significantly higher pushout stress as compared to the chosen fibrin glue. Ultimately, bioadhesive technology must progress in order for them to become clinically appealing enough to use for scaffold implementation.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
School of Biomedical Engineering
Sponsors:
Regenerative Engineering Laboratory (Columbia), Transformative Biomaterials and Biotechnology Laboratory (Penn State)
Advisors:
Christian Puttlitz, Kirk McGilvray, Soham Ghosh

Bulk Wine Shipping

Project ID: 13

Students:

Adam Cholak, Coco Renier, Karla Rueda-Perez, Cory Taylor
The purpose of this project was to develop a bulk wine shipping container for bottled wine. Bottled wine is susceptible to damage under extreme temperatures, so it was important to keep the interior of the container within a safe temperature range of 30ºF and 75ºF. The number one priority for the project was the thermal performance of the container. The second priority was the reusability aspect so that it meets Liviri and wineries’ sustainability goals. The goal was to maximize the number of uses while minimizing the cost per use. During the team’s design process, it was important to explore several ideas before moving forward with the modeling and subsequent build. The team began the development phase by creating a quality function deployment (QFD) to meet customer requirements. Then the team worked through the design phase using morphology charts, decision matrices, and concepting templates. The group’s initial ideas would cause radical changes to the distribution process and increase labor time, so compromises to the first round of design ideas were made. The team pivoted to focusing time on an exterior container that kept bottled wine safe from extreme temperatures without the use of refrigerated trucks while being compatible with current cardboard boxed wine cases. By slowly implementing a reusable shipping container and removing refrigerated trucks from the equation, the team can confidently advertise this product to distributors, and increase the market share Liviri currently has in bottled wine shipping.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Liviri
Advisors:
Zebhi Banafshe, Erin Estrada, Bonnie Roberts, Dr. Wade Troxell

COVID-19 WASTEWATER SAMPLING SYSTEM

Project ID: 22

Students:

Mohamed Al Ghassani, Wail Alkindi, Bryce Christensen
Wastewater sampling systems collect sewage samples that are used to detect viruses and pathogens such as COVID-19. Wastewater epidemiology tracks the spread of disease in the community by monitoring how much of the virus is flushed and drained out of our dorms, homes, and buildings. CSU collects this data, which can be used to predict outbreaks of COVID weeks before the data from nasal swab testing. Our group was tasked with creating a prototype for a new sewage autosampler machine. The new sampler should ideally be lighter than the old machine, be able to reduce clogging, have a method of cooling that controls the temperature of the system, have an onboard maceration system, minimize contact of raw sewage, and finally, it should still retain the ability to sample over a 24 hour period without human operators. During the testing of the prototype, the autosampler was able to achieve most of the stated goals, with the remaining errors being mostly electrical bugs. Because of this, our device is close to, but not quite ready, for service inside a sewer line.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Dr. Bryan Wilson
Advisors:
Dr. Bryan Wilson, Adam Schneiderhan

Development of a Printhead for Composite Printing

Project ID: 24

Students:

Mazin Al Hinai, Nate Dowdy, Cameron Denison, Heaven Smith
Composites are continually making a big impact in industry given their superior material properties, but the traditional manufacturing processes incur high cost and high energy consumption. Our project can reduce the limitations found in traditional composite manufacturing by developing a system to print continuous carbon fiber with a thermosetting resin. Our team is tasked with engineering a printhead that can be attached to a six-axis robot with the capabilities of impregnating dry carbon fiber and curing the fiber to print a continuous composite.  With the six-axis robot and attached printhead, the aim is to be able to make quality prints consisting of fully cured fiber with uniform layers. The printhead is primarily responsible for two functions: impregnation and curing. The impregnation process takes place inside the printhead, with the spool of fiber being drawn into a syringe of resin that thoroughly saturates the fiber. With the help of a silicone roller, the soaked fiber is then uniformly pushed onto the printing bed. Following the roller, a 590 nm blue laser is used to cure the fiber. The printhead is then capable of printing a composite item in conjunction with the robot.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Mostafa Yourdkhani
Advisors:
Mostafa Yourdkhani, Adam Schneiderhan

E-Machine to Engine Crankshaft Mechanical Drive System

Project ID: 12

Students:

Jacob Schlagel, Nolan Sherrill, Brent Fields, and Cameron Crandall
Modern environmental and sustainability goals have led to the production of vehicles that incorporate hybrid powertrain system to pair an internal combustion (IC) engine with an electric motor (E-Machine). Hybrid powertrain systems can reduce hazardous emissions and fuel consumption and improve a vehicle’s overall performance. The IC engine and E-Machine must be linked by a mechanical drive system, and the method used is critical for the hybrid powertrain's overall performance. While hybrid powertrain systems are becoming more common in automobiles, the technology is not as developed for equipment that needs to be capable of larger loads. The overall goal of this project is to determine the most suited mechanical drive system to incorporate in a parallel hybrid powertrain system that could be operated between an E-Machine and one of John Deere's light-duty industrial engines. This senior design group developed a test fixture to conduct preliminary, small-scale experiments on direct, belt, chain, and gear drive systems, which were also designed by the team. Factors such as mechanical efficiency, ease of replacement, feasibility, noise, vibration, and design were all considered when comparing the different mechanical drive systems. Based on test data and observations, a belt system was selected as the optimal mechanical drive system. The small-scale experiments and conclusions also gave direction on future testing and how this project could delve deeper.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
John Deere
Advisors:
Dr. Dan Olsen, Don Grove, and Robin Bremmer

FSAE

Project ID: 30

Students:

Gage Bock, Sam Eckdahl, Josh Goetz, Chris Graffia, Liam Gray, Leif Hall, Christian Hanson, Adam Hooker, Vince Lehman, Evan Lipsky, Jared Martinez, Scott Murakami, Calvin Murray, Brandon O'Hern, Tony Priolo, Patrick Slaught, Ryan Walkowicz,
Formula SAE (FSAE) is a student competition organized by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) in which universities around the world design, manufacture, and race an open-wheeled race car. Each team competes in 5 dynamic events and 3 static events, where they are judged and scored out of 1000 possible points. The dynamic events test the vehicle and driver’s physical capabilities and are worth a total of 675 possible points. The dynamic events consist of acceleration, skidpad, autocross, and endurance which is paired with fuel economy. Throughout the events, the race car will be operated by a student driver who will be required to steer, accelerate, brake, and shift the vehicle to accomplish the best possible results. The static events are worth the remaining 325 points, and consist of a design evaluation, cost report, and sales presentation. This project provides students with a unique engineering experience that allows them to practice in their respective fields, as well as working within a large team environment to accomplish their goals.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
ST Engineering-Middle River Aerostructure Systems, DFC Mechanical, Wine Country Motor Sports, Painless Performance Products, Colorado State Rapid Prototyping Lab
Advisors:
Chris Weinberger, Sudeep Pasricha, Matt Kronwell

H2O & GO

Project ID: 25

Students:

Sarah Danekind, Ryan Carrigan, Cameron McCormick, Tommy Zakrzewski, Zach Klein
People with disabilities are faced with many challenges and can often be left behind. One such area where this can be seen is in aquatic environments. While the world has made excellent progress on making most land activities wheelchair accessible, it is still lagging behind on doing the same for aquatic recreation. Several products on the market seek to alleviate this issue, but none offer full independence in the water while also serving as a viable form of transportation on land. The goal of the H2O & GO amphibious wheelchair is to serve as a device that is capable of performing both actions. Land maneuverability is similar to traditional wheelchairs, with handles on the back rest as well as handrails on either wheel. The handrails allow the user to independently propel themselves. Once in the water, the device features a pair of levers that allow the user to convert their own power into propulsion via a ratcheting system attached to a series of gears and two propellers. This use of bilateral ratcheting levers and dual propulsion systems, offers the user a full range of maneuverability in all directions. The primary goal of this year’s design team was to improve upon last year’s prototypical design. In doing so, the new design features drastic reductions in weight, price, and overall size while increasing maneuverability both on land in water.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Brandon Cook
Advisors:
Samuel Bechara, Bert Vermeulen, Adam Schneiderhan

Heavy Lift UAV

Project ID: 18

Students:

Zachary Alves, Marcus Amrine, Nicolas Del Toro, Nick Malwitz, Peyton McNeill, Jonathon Philpott
Wildlands firefighting is one of the most dangerous jobs in the current day as an average of 18 people die in the profession every year. We believe that a heavy-lift UAV platform could prove to be lifesaving technology for these brave men and women. We have reconstructed the design from the previous year’s team to create a more modular frame that is capable of completing the intended support and equipment delivery missions. We have designed and created an isogrid sandwich style fuselage which has saved weight and organized the flight hardware of the drone. The modular isogrid plates have tapped holes every 1.5” which has allowed us to rigidly secure down all flight systems using 3D printed mounts and has given us room to integrate the modular payload carrier and release system. We have also implemented a camera and gimbal system to allow for the identification of safe drop off locations. A busbar has been added as well in order to consolidate all electronics onto a single power distribution system. The UAV in its new configuration will be able to reach firefighting or EMS teams in hazardous locations and easily deliver emergency medical gear or necessary tools.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Rapid Prototyping Lab
Advisors:
John Mizia, Kristen LeBar

House of Pressure

Project ID: 17

Students:

Ammar Balushi, Kiho You, Logan Templeton
Carbon monoxide poisoning causes 430 deaths and 50,000 emergency room visits per year. This type of indoor air poisoning is a danger that has preluded to research being done on the topic. 11 years ago, a house of pressure was built at the University of Iowa to serve as a teaching instrument about indoor air quality for the community. This was done with a 24’x6’x8’ (LxWxH) house that had 5 typical appliances and a smoke machine/duct system to connect them all. Today, the CSU senior design team has been tasked to update the house of pressure with some improved methods. The senior design team has built a 24’x6’,12’ (LxWxH) house in accordance with the current platform-frame construction practices. The house contains the initial 5 appliances, 8 pressure gauges, 18 motorized dampers, 3 duct fans, smoke machine, kitchen fume hood, bathroom fan and associated ductwork. These components along with manual dampers on the house exterior will serve as variables for the instructor to utilize during class. The House of Pressure’s goal is to aid indoor air quality instruction for the greater Fort Collins area.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Mr. Paul Francisco
Advisors:
Dr. Tami Bond

Hydro Sustainability System

Project ID: 4

Students:

Logan Jucksch, Joshua Scott, Andrew Callaway, Shannon Huddleston, Stephanie Platt, Chandler Horst
Quality alongside sustainable practices are the core values of Riff Raff Brewing Company. This project looks to highlight these values by designing and fabricating a water recirculation system to decrease natural resource waste in order to defrost proteins in their restaurant for a fraction of the cost and time. By replacing their current method of continuously running water in a sink to a temperature controlled recirculating water pump system, water usage can be decreased by up to 600 gallons per day in addition to a 50% faster defrost time. The device consists of an insulated cooler with a recirculating pump attached. A temperature controller and water heater within the cooler keeps the water bath at an optimal temperature within the United States Food and Drug Administration and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment standards for defrosting protein. Additionally, a 3D-printed food-safe rack system is implemented to prevent proteins from coming into contact with the container and heating element. This system was designed with Riff Raff’s continued promise of improved sustainability in mind.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Jason Cox, Riff Raff Brewing
Advisors:
Bonnie Roberts, Erin Estrada

Hydrogen Blending and Emissions Controls on a Stoichiometric Natural Gas Engine with 3-Way Catalyst

MECH 498 Research Practicum

Students:

Nick Katsampes
Hydrogen-natural gas fuel blending on a spark ignited stoichiometric engine with the goal of studying the effects on the 3-way catalyst, lowering emissions, and improving engine operation. This research also intends to explore advanced air/fuel ratio controls and spark timing variation to further improve operation.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Advisors:
Daniel B. Olsen

In-Cylinder Methods for Fugitive Methane Reduction in a 4-Stroke Natural Gas Engine

MECH 498 Research Practicum

Students:

Justin Bayer
In-Cylinder Methods for Fugitive Methane Reduction in a 4-Stroke Natural Gas Engine
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Caterpillar
Advisors:
Dr. Daniel Olsen, Dr. Bret Windom

Life Cycle and Techno-Economic Comparison of EV Charging Systems

MECH 498 Research Practicum

Students:

Dominic Dallago
This research aims to compare the cost and environmental effects of four different EV charging systems. The goal of this comparison is to inform policy makers on the environmental and economic tradeoffs of the implementation of different charging systems. Life cycle and techno-economic analysis models were used to analyze each system. The models consider how different times of use for each charging system effect both price and emissions based on local grid mixes and electrical pricing. The systems are compared on a state-by-state basis for the year 2020 and 2050. This work will be the first to compare all currently developed charging technologies and how their specific use schedules effect emissions and lifetime costs. Furthermore, through this research lifecycle and techno-economic models were built that will allow for the comparative analysis of future systems. This work found that based on current energy grid pricing and emissions that the PC home charging network is the optimal system to deploy in 2020. With a cleaner energy grid in the future, the WPT system will be the cleaner technology to deploy; however, the WPT system may still be economically unfeasible unless costs are reduced.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
USU Aspire
Advisors:
Jason Quinn

Magna-Shox Vehicle Dynamics Modeling

Project ID: 26

Students:

Grayson Barber, Jake Cinkus, Evan Hirsch, London Kubicek, Jacob Petterle
Magna-Shox has developed a next generation electronic shock absorber, offering the possibility of unprecedented control, comfort, and handling. To take advantage of this system, the team was tasked with developing a vehicle model to predict the acceleration of the vehicle body from three sensors onboard a shock absorber, allowing for a modular product that can be mounted on a variety of vehicles. Based on the goals of Magna-Shox, objectives were chosen and prioritized based on value add, including the development of a vehicle dynamics model for bumps encountered at speeds less than 50mph, city driving with speeds less than 50mph, and highway driving with speeds greater than 50mph. After 65+ trials of testing, the team has concluded that three sensors onboard a shock absorber can sufficiently predict the acceleration that the vehicle body/passenger experiences within a reasonable margin of error, and would like to continue developing the vehicle model to reduce this margin of error further.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
CSU Venture Fund, Magna-Shox
Advisors:
Bert Vermeulen, Mike Martinez, Matt Kronwall

Mechanical Prosthesis for Quadruple Amputee

Project ID: 29

Students:

Blaine Nye, Melanie Blake, Peter Sperl
Ellis Kavanagh lost all four limbs at two years of age. All his previous upper limb prostheses have failed to meet his needs in various ways including inaccurate motor control, weight, inefficiency, and discomfort; thus at age twenty-four, he still performs activities of daily life (ADLs) without them. Ellis’ independence from upper extremity prosthetic devices comes at the cost of safety and efficiency: he must contort his body into non-ergonomic positions to grasp and manipulate objects, which leads to worsening joint dysfunction and potentially osteoarthritis. The purpose of Project 29 is to provide Ellis with a mechanized transhumeral prosthesis for his right arm, allowing him to perform ADLs with superior ease and efficacy while preventing further health complications. Objectives include precise motor control, minimization of weight, maximization of movement efficiency, and maximized duration of comfortable use. These objectives are being achieved through innovative methods of both subtractive and additive manufacturing. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing is used to fabricate a human-device interfacing cuff with complex organic geometry, while weight-reducing structural milling techniques are used to optimize the terminal device. The final product is still in the developmental stage, but rapid prototyping and testing has allowed considerable acceleration of the design process towards Ellis’ optimal prosthesis.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Colorado State University Department of Mechanical Engineering
Advisors:
Dr. Samuel Bechara, James Tillotson, Steve Johnson, Michael Poland

Motorbike Swingarm Guards

Project ID: 27

Students:

Bryce Barsnick, Tyler Jacobsen, Devin Funaro
Team 27, now known as Crosslinked Components, set out to develop a swingarm protection system for KTM, Husqvarna and GasGas dirtbikes that adequately protects the swingarm according to customer needs. Throughout the year the swingarm guard design was developed concurrently with a manufacturing system capable of cost effectively creating the guards at a relatively high volume. A provisional patent was filed around the unique mounting solution used on the guards. Crosslinked Components LLC was formed and through an online sales platform the guards were brought to market and has yielded 23 swingarm guard sales to date. Overall, the project required a large design and manufacturing effort in order to successfully bring the product to market and the team learned a tremendous amount through this whole process.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Crosslinked Components LLC
Advisors:
Bert Vermeulen, Noel Marshall

NASA Robotic Mining Competition

Project ID: 31

Students:

Corbyn Berg, Ryan Bushue, Dylan Clem, Michael Irlbeck, Charlie Kim, Noah Kolda, Logan Litchfield, Hunter Pearson, Carissa Vos, Zelin Yang
The team’s goals are to design, build, and test an autonomous mining robot that will compete in the annual LUNABOTICs mining competition held at the Kennedy Space Station in May. NASA hosts the competition for universities around the nation to source innovative solutions to autonomously retrieve icy regolith beneath the surface of extraterrestrial bodies. The primary challenge of the competition is to design, build and program a robot that is capable of mining regolith on the lunar surface during the Artemis missions. The team set goals to solve these problems based on the constraints set by NASA. To maximize points at the competition, the team's driving goals have been to mine consistently and efficiently navigate the arena. With these driving goals in mind, the robot was designed and constructed to meet the given project constraints and objectives. Testing is ongoing with initial results indicating that the robot will be able to traverse the lunar simulated surface and obstacles.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Allied Electronics & Automation, HP Inc., RPL
Advisors:
Dr. Jianguo Zhao, Matt Kronwall

Naturally Degrading Drop-Off Mechanism for Mule Deer GPS Collars

Project ID: 15

Students:

Adam Lujan, Caleb Hollingsworth, Eli Burns
Through close work with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, a new design for naturally degrading drop-off mechanisms has been made for mule deer location tracking collars. This design is made to provide the reliability seen in high-end electronic drop-offs at a lower cost. Using environmental data in multiple locations in Colorado, humidity was determined to be a constant factor. Research led the team to find PCL (PolyCaproLactone), which is a polymer that degrades due to humidity. This polymer is used in many medical applications because of its ability to degrade in a predictable manner. PCL is also a 3D printable material, allowing for rapid prototyping and easy manufacturing processes. The physical design of the drop-off was modeled after the current cotton spacer that was on a sample provided by the sponsor. This allows their field technicians to easily transition to the new device, without compromising collar shape or function. PCL is an improvement to this cotton design because cotton does not degrade reliably, especially in Colorado. Simulated environmental degradation data will be collected by the team. This data will inform if the device has a high success rate. The data that will be taken from these tests can be used to tailor the drop-off devices to be used in both different environments and different lengths of study.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Colorado Parks & Wildlife
Advisors:
Kirk McGilvray, Erin Estrada

New Belgium Brewing CoGen Integration

Project ID: 3

Students:

Andrew Hubler, Langzhou Jin, James Kennedy, Jacob Mueller
Due to rapid growth and innovation, the utility systems of New Belgium Brewing lacked detailed Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams (P&ID) which hindered the analysis of their brewing system and the location of instruments. The team was tasked with the creation of utility P&IDs, beginning with steam, and ending with glycol. It was crucial that the P&IDs accurately resemble the physical system so that they can be used in the future to plan modifications and additions to each utility. The team went about documentation by beginning at the source of the utility and dividing it into sections so that each member of the team was documenting a smaller part of the overall system. Once individual sections had been completed, they were consolidated into the drawings and formatted to match New Belgium drawing standards. Through the completion of utility P&IDs, the team was able to correct inaccuracies found in the current drawings being used. Additionally, the team completed an equipment level energy balance which analyzed the energy flows through a brew kettle. These completed deliverables will allow New Belgium to improve their designs to achieve their goal of carbon neutrality by 2030.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
New Belgium Brewing: Laura Landes & Andy Collins
Advisors:
Dr. Bonnie Roberts

NexDraft

Project ID: 5

Students:

Ryan Hughes, Sean McDonough, Katie Sheridan, Zach Sutherland
Sustainable Beverage Technologies (SBT) has designed a system to concentrate a traditionally brewed beer to 1/6th its original volume by removing water and alcohol. SBT has named this system BrewVo and their product Multi-Brewed Beer (MBB). Using the BrewVo system, SBT would like to bring energy efficient beer to the market but face a problem; presently commercial beer tap systems cannot support the BrewVo technology. Working with SBT, Team 5 has begun development on a compact system to reconstitute MBBs up to their serving volume using on site water. The NexDraft system is to be designed with versatility, able to dispense any number of beers from a single water and alcohol source. Among these objectives, Team 5 has also been requested to reduce CO2 break out in the final product by streamlining the mixing process. The NexDraft unit is to be designed with existing draft system technology making implementation into restaurant infrastructure is seamless.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Sustainable Beverage Technologies
Advisors:
Dr. Bonnie C. Roberts, Dr. Wade Troxell, Adam Schneiderhan

Novel Molten Salt Neutron Imaging Furnace

MECH 498 Research Practicum

Students:

Caleb Horan
Molten salts are positioned to revolutionize technologies such as nuclear reactors, renewable energy storage, and the recycling of nuclear fuel [1]. However, current density values lack essential certainties for preliminary computer modeling in these applications. Neutron radiography is a prime candidate for measuring these density values but has its own faults. The primary obstacle is a two-dimensional neutron image being taken of a three- dimensional volume [2]. To mitigate these uncertainties, a 360o rotational component will be added to the experiment. Project Statement: Design/deploy a 1200° C capable furnace, with temperature monitoring and the ability to support the neutron imaging of radiological samples while rotating the sample containment.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Advisors:
Dr. Azer Yalin, Dale (Travis) Carver

Oral Rabies Vaccine Helicopter Delivery

Project ID: 6

Students:

Ian French, Brian Troutman, Colton Hanratty, Matthew Allen
A major development in the fight against rabies is the Oral Rabies Vaccine (ORV). Coated in a fishmeal polymer which acts as bait, the ORV has made vaccinating large groups of wild animals significantly easier. Distribution via aircraft makes this process much more efficient, but it requires wide drop zones. Issues arise when dropping baits over human-inhabited areas. Usage of helicopters rather than fixed-wing aircraft has helped to mitigate some of these issues and is the method the USDA uses to distribute baits. However, automated systems do not currently exist for helicopters. The purpose of this project is to develop an accurate counting and mapping system in conjunction with a reliable automated bait dispenser to expand operational capabilities and increase efficiency of the ORV delivery process. This task was approached by developing the systems separately before attempting to integrate them into one device. The result is a functional prototype of a conveyor-based distribution device, and a functional laser-based counting system in conjunction with a GPS. Combining the two has proved to be very challenging, and efforts are ongoing to solve the issue of sorting and separating baits as they exit the device in order to count accurately.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Dr. Amy Gilbert, USDA
Advisors:
Dr. Wade Troxell, Michael Poland

Otter Products Thermal Device Management

Project ID: 14

Students:

Alexis Brickert, Trevor Koch, Parker Berg
With the increased use of mobile technology in business, device reliability is as imperative as ever. The goal of the Otter Products thermal device management project is to allow a sealed iPad to function on a hot and sunny day without compromising usability. The solution was to provide these benefits passively through a combination of different components. The screen is covered with 3M Crystalline which blocks 79% of incoming radiation. On the back of the case, careful material selection allows heat to be quickly moved from the iPad to a set of aluminum fins. The fins then dissipate the heat to the surrounding air. Finally, the prototype is sealed with a 3D printed bumper. A testing apparatus was engineered to reliably test the thermal management. Heat lamps simulate the sun, fans simulate user movement or a breeze, and a box holds in the hot air. The tested parameters were full sun at 90F and a 3mph wind speed. The prototype was compared to the Defender Series case which overheated the iPad in just 30 minutes. The final prototype was found to provide enough cooling to keep the device from shutting down, even after a full day in the heat and sun.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Dallas Scaggs, Travis Smith
Advisors:
1) Bonnie Roberts 2) Adam Schneiderhan

Plasma Chamber Load-Lock System

Project ID: 11

Students:

Adrien Hernandez, Alex Pajak, Alex Serbousek, Azzan Al Ismaili, Brandon Jutte
Plasma Etching is a common process used in the production of semiconductors. These semiconductor chips power the digital revolution and allow data to be processed at ever increasing speeds, allowing humanity to solve increasingly complex problems in a complex world. Due to the wide variety of problems that need solving in the semiconductor industry, Mechanical Engineers are well suited for designing the tools required for manufacturing these chips. This is where the project sponsor, Advanced Energy, and the senior design team come in. For the Plasma Chamber Load-Lock System project, the team aims to tackle some of the problems associated with testing a plasma etching system to get it ready for production by building a load-lock system for Advanced Energy’s plasma source testing chamber. This load-lock will allow Advance Energy to test their plasma source at a more rapid pace by reducing the time between tests, reduce contamination and moisture in the system, and create a more stable testing environment that increases the repeatability of the tests. These improvements combined with an integrated electronic monitoring system should allow Advanced Energy to confidently increase their testing throughput and more easily get their plasma sources ready for production.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Advanced Energy
Advisors:
Tushar Shimpi, Erin Estrada, Adam Danielson

Spaceport America Cup (Rocket Team)

Project ID: 32

Students:

Aidan Bruno, Anthony Lopez, Chris Fueg, Daniel Buck, Derek Labahn, Dillon Vance, Giacomo Morini, Jackson Lipke, Jayvin Krzych, Jonathan Buck, Noah Probst, Sam Stinson, Tait Freestone, Taylor Mancini, Trevorkyle Pelletier, and Tyler Pedersen.
Rocket Senior Design Team is competing in Spaceport America Cup with a sounding rocket that will aim for an apogee of 10,000 feet and safely recover all rocket parts. Liquid motors are technically challenging since the propellants require plumbing to move the fuel and oxidizer into the combustion chamber. Colorado State’s rocket team aims to leave a legacy of safety and innovation for future students to develop sounding rockets at a higher education. In this same spirit, Colorado State faculty created an aerospace concentration for mechanical and electrical engineering. The team’s liquid engine uses ethanol for fuel and nitrous oxide for oxidizer. Nitrous oxide self-pressurizes at room temperature. The tank is designed to use this phenomenon to generate propellant flow of the fuel and oxidizer into the combustion chamber. Airframe utilizes fiberglass for radio frequency transparency and high strength to weight ratio. Recovery of the rocket uses a drogue and main parachute to control the descent of the rocket and minimize drift. Payload predicts the altitude of the rocket in flight and transmits data to a ground station. Successful integration of all these systems will enable the team to be successful at Spaceport America Cup. Rocket Team had a successful subscale launch in February and April with all of the rocket components recovered. First static test fire had successful propellant loading but a ball valve failure caused an abort. The next hot fire test is planned for Thursday April 14th at the Engineering Research Center. Rocket Team has a clear understanding of Spaceport America Cup expectations.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Mechanical Engineering, Hewlett-Packard, Colorado Spacegrant Consortium, C-zero
Advisors:
Bret Windom, Karen Thorsett-Hill, and Matt Kronwall.

Submersible Pump Turbine

Project ID: 1

Students:

Timothy Maffei, Erik Kvietkus, Scott Dudek, John Petersen, Drew Blais
Submersible Pump Turbines can generate power by harvesting kinetic energy from water. When there is a power grid surplus, they can pump water to be stored as potential energy for later use. Obermeyer Hydro Inc. is developing a proprietary pump turbine system that could have a relatively higher pump efficiency with a smaller pump station footprint. The project team's primary goal was to design a grid-level power connector that can connect and operate in the bottom of a 25–100-foot hole, submerged in water and debris. First, the electrical components were sized based off power transmission requirements. Then, mechanical designs were assessed to maximize the ease of clearing water and cleaning the connector. The geometrical design was driven by voltage breakdown distances and the ability to simplify the cleaning process. Several conceptual designs were considered ranging from multiple pins to flat-faced sealed conductors. After completing the conceptual model, two prototypes were produced to understand the cleaning and mating processes which led to further conclusions and revisions to the design and its fabrication.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Obermeyer Hydro Inc.: Jeff Gessaman, Henry Obermeyer
Advisors:
Wade Troxell, Adam Danielson, Kristen LeBar

The Role of the Nucleus in Collective Cell Migration

MECH 498 Research Practicum

Students:

Brady Hine
Cell migration is a fundamental process in normal physiology and pathology. The cell nucleus is emerging as a key mediator in this process. Being the largest and stiffest organelle in eukaryotic cells, the nucleus acts as a limiting factor during cell migration. The role of nuclear mechanics in cell migration is therefore a topic of recent interest to both the basic science and clinical research communities. The objective of this work is to study how nuclear mechanical properties and chromatin remodeling affect collective cell migration using a model system of the scratch wound assay. A quantitative understanding of collective cell migration has been obtained using live time lapse imaging of cells with modified nuclear stiffness and altered chromatin remodeling abilities.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
School of Biomedical Engineering
Advisors:
Soham Ghosh, Kirk McGilvray, Christian Puttlitz

Torque Optimization & Enhanced Temp Capability

Project ID: 10

Students:

Kyle Conrad, Kyle Grinwald, Jason LaRoe, Dakota Lowery
Woodward requested that the 2021-22 Senior Design team improve upon the Active Clearance Control Valve (ACCV) through an aero-torque optimized butterfly valve plate, composite valve flowbody, and improved temperature and fireproof characteristics. The ACCV is an air valve used in turbine engines of commercial aircraft. The valve is responsible for regulating early-stage fan bleed air to the turbine case in order to manage the clearance to the turbine blade tip for increased efficiency. Research was conducted to find material and design attributes that decrease max aero-torque and increase survivability with lighter-weight composites. Design and Analysis across revisions lead to plate geometries that counter-acted the closing force the airflow provides. Selected composite materials were found to be difficult to procure in time. Fireproof materials were found that would allow the composite to survive the required FAA 2000F 15-minute burn test, but could not be tested as a coating on the intended high-temperature composite. Further investigation would benefit objective of a replacement air valve that takes advantage of the lightweight composites and improved aero-torque design to lower required actuation forces.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Woodward Inc.
Advisors:
Mike Morgan, Jonathan Lumpkin, Kristen LeBar, Banafshe Zebhi, Dr. Petro, and Dr. Roberts

VariStroke-P

Project ID: 8

Students:

Joe Kerchinsky, Jethro Leroux, Trevor Long, Alexander Lynch, Connor McGlynn, Alejandra Valenzuela
Woodward is a leading manufacturer of precise and reliable steam turbine controls. Steam turbine control valve actuators are required to accurately control the amount of steam flowing through a steam turbine for safety, efficiency, and compatibility to the electric grid. A worldwide increase in the use of smaller steam turbines has initiated this project's design of a replacement to current outdated, costly, and less robust smaller steam turbine control valve actuators. The VariStroke-P team succeeded in designing a smaller, cost-effective, dirt-tolerant, and safe control valve actuator. The team used a novel spring-diaphragm design coupled with a pressure sensor to eliminate the need for expensive and large hydraulic cylinder LVDT position sensors. VariStroke-P achieved a positional accuracy of +-0.003" and a stall force of 830lbf while successfully utilizing Woodward's CPC-II servo valve for it's proven dirt-tolerance.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Woodward, Inc.: Josh Been, Jason Brack
Advisors:
Bonnie Roberts, Erin Estrada

VTOL UAV-Sensor Exfiltration architecture

Project ID: 2

Students:

Noah Davis, Aaron DeJong, Kyle Lanning, Ryan Pfannenstiel, Garrett Robison, Tobias Rubenfeld, Noah Schenck, Michael Skotynsky, Michael Townsend
Augustus Aerospace Company (AAC) identified a need for a flying test bed for their sensor exfiltration architecture payloads. After testing multiple commercial platforms, they had not found a design that met their take-off and flight endurance requirements. AAC tasked our design team with developing an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) and solar charging capabilities to enable testing of their hardware. The team pooled information on existing UAV & VTOL technology to identify key parameters and design features. The 9-member team was split into 4 sub-teams to focus on Aerodynamics & Structures, Power & Propulsion, Controls & Sensors, and Communications/Ground Control. Our team designed and built an aircraft that met the AAC’s design objectives that included VTOL, 12-hour flight time, and a 10,000ft operating altitude. Over the course of the project the team utilized CFD, FEA, and component testing to validate aircraft structural integrity and flight characteristics prior to construction. Given the limited time to complete this project it was imperative that the vast majority of both semesters be dedicated to design, testing, and iteration. As a result, the team was able to rapidly manufacture the aircraft in the weeks leading up to E-days. The team internalized lessons about determining parallel paths to optimize manpower, identified manufacturing capabilities, and reaped the benefits of front loading design iterations before beginning construction.
Department:
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsors:
Augustus Aerospace Company
Advisors:
Dr. Wade Troxell, Michael Poland