Walter Scott, Jr. College of Engineering

Our Global Impact

Our Global Impact:

Transportation Systems and Aerospace

From spy satellites to engineering career coach: Mechanical alumnus gives back

Drew Crouch, a former Ball Aerospace and Ball Corporation executive, has two mechanical engineering degrees from CSU. Now retired, he shares his experience with students about career paths and industry changes as Director of Strategic Initiatives in the Walter Scott, Jr. College of Engineering.

Crouch led businesses at Ball that engineered the kind of stuff you see in movies – like how to get to other planets, build spy satellites and hide military aircraft from adversaries. 

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Innovation, Commercialization, and Entrepreneurship

Nelson Isaacson, a graduate student researcher, is working with mechanical engineering professor David Prawel to 3D-print a material that’s almost chemically identical to bone.  

The goal is to make this material stronger for surgeries of patients facing bone damage to use in places such as hips and legs that bare considerable weight. Nelson and Prawel aim to make the material bioresorbable, meaning that once it is implanted into a human body, the bone-like material will incorporate itself into the existing bone and become virtually unnoticeable. 

Health and Wellness

Methane Emissions Test and Evaluation Center focuses on detecting gas leaks

At the Methane Emissions Technology Evaluation Center, researchers study natural gas leaks by recreating the equipment and conditions at a real gas and oil well site. By detecting leaks sooner, this research improves systems to protect the environment and community health.

Researchers aim to address the shortcomings of existing methane monitoring devices by introducing new technologies that can estimate methane emission flow rates, provide continuous monitoring, localize the leak source, and improve the accuracy of methane detection.

Energy Efficiency and the Environment

Enhancing solar cell encapsulation to improve reliability

“The amount of sun that falls on the planet in one hour is enough to power us for a year,” says Barth. “Solar is truly an energy solution if we can find the manufacturing opportunities and efficiency and develop the technology sufficiently to realize its potential.”  

Solar needs to function well in various conditions and must also be cost-effective and last as long as possible. Barth and his team look to improve solar in these critical areas. They are introducing a new technology that will cut fabrication time for vacuum lamination of thin-film solar cells from 12 minutes to approximately 30 seconds.  

Mechanical engineering at Colorado State University is about using our knowledge of materials, energy, and health to solve society’s global engineering challenges.

Mechanical engineering at Colorado State University is about using our knowledge of materials, energy, and health to solve society’s global engineering challenges.

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