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I am a Reseach Scientist II at the Atmospheric Science Department of Colorado State University and a member of Prof. Heald Research Group (MIT) since 2011. In July of 2014, I joined the faculty of the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department of The University of Sheffield, UK. I received my undergraduate degree in Agriculture Engineering from the Universidad Politecnica of Valencia in Spain, and obtained a MS and PhD in Environmental Engineering from Michigan Technological University. In 2007, I joined the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling Group at Harvard University as a postdoctoral research associate, and later I was a visiting research scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

 

My research interest is the understanding the composition and chemistry of the troposphere, in particular what controls the abundance of air pollutants and greenhouse gases, how air pollutants are transported, and the connections between climate and air quality. 

 

Some example of my current and previous areas of study are:

 

Sequia National Park affected by air pollution

 

 

 

Effect of changing climate on the US National Parks air quality

The F.A.O. reported in 2007 that by 2100 about 50% of the forest area will be exposed to damaging O3 levels, and by 2050, about 20% will exceed critical loads of S and N.

We are using the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) with the RCP scenarios to assess the potential future consequences of climate, anthropogenic and biogenic emissions and land cover changes on O3, PM2.5 and N deposition in the U.S. National Parks.

More information

M. Val Martin, C.L. Heald, J-F Lamarque, S. Tilmes and L. Emmons, Effects of the Changing Climate and Emissions on the Air Quality in the U.S. National Parks, World Climate Research Programme Conference, Denver, October 27.

 

MISR visible image of the Station Fire in California 2009, with MODIS fire pixels in red dots.

Fire smoke injection heights and the effect of wildfire emissions on the atmosphere

The occurrence of boreal wildfires has increased in the last decades as a result of drier and warmer conditions [e.g., Westerling et al., 2007] and increasing human impacts [Mollicone et al., 2006]. At present, it is unclear how best to represent the vertical distribution of fire emissions in global models because of a lack of data with which to test the parameterizations

We analyzed an extensive record of aerosol smoke plume heights derived from observations over North America made by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument. The objective was to characterize the magnitude and variability of smoke plume heights, and assess the contribution of local atmospheric and fire conditions to this variability.

We also evaluated a 1-D plume-rise model driven by fire properties and local meteorology.  Smoke injection heights were simulated using different fire characteristic configurations, based on MODIS and empirical data, and using the MISR smoke plume height dataset as a constraint.

 

More information

M. Val Martin, J. A. Logan, R. Kahn, F.-Y. Leung, D. Nelson and D. Diner, Smoke injection heights from fires in North America: Analysis of 5 years of satellite observations, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 10, 1491-1510, acp-2009-513.

M. Val Martin, R. A. Kahn, J. A. Logan, R. Paugam, M. Wooster and C. Ichoku, Space-based observational constraints for 1-D plume rise models, J. Geophys. Res., 117, D22204,
doi:10.1029/2012JD018370, 2012.

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: DCP_0389_resized_cropped2 View of the Pico Mountain Station in the remote Pico Island over the central North Atlantic region, with the BAE 146 research aircraft in the background during an intercomparison exercice.

 

  Working inside the station

Tropospheric Composition over Remote Regions

Abundance and distribution of nitrogen oxides and other trace gases in the remote troposphere still remains unclear. Although valuable information is available from globak models and satellite observations, the validation of these tools is limited by an inadequate coverage of trace gases in remote regions.

As a part of my PhD, I made measurements of NO, NO2 and NOy at the Pico Mountain Observatory, over the central North Atlantic lower free troposphere from July 2002 to August 2005. I also collaborated with measurements of CO, O3, aerosol BC, C2-C6 NMHCs and meteorological parameters at the observatory.

The goal was to study the seasonal cycle of nitrogen oxides in the background over the North Atlantic lower free troposphere, the processes controlling the abundance of these species over the region and potential effects on O3 production.  

More information

M. Val Martin, R. Honrath, R. C. Owen and Q. Li, Seasonal variation of nitrogen oxides in the central North Atlantic lower free troposphere, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D17307, doi:10.1029/2007JD009688.

M. Val Martin, R. Honrath, R. C. Owen and K. Lapina,  Large-scale impacts of anthropogenic pollution and boreal wildfires on the nitrogen oxides over the central North Atlantic, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D17307 doi:10.1029/2007JD009689.

M. Val Martin, R. Honrath, R. C. Owen, G. Pfister, P. Fialho and F. Barata, Significant enhancements of nitrogen oxides, ozone and aerosol black carbon in the North Atlantic lower free troposphere resulting from North American boreal wildfires, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D23S60, doi:10.1029/2006JD007530, 2006.