Ten new faculty hires in 2018

Ten new faculty hires in 2018

Joshua Chan, assistant professor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering; CSU Microbiome Network

Joshua Chan

Chemical and Biological Engineering

Joshua Chan is an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and a faculty member in the CSU Microbiome Network. His research focuses on modeling and engineering microbiomes. In the post-genomics era, the availability of genome sequences and multi-omics data presents a unique opportunity to construct systems biological models to understand and predict microbiomes in terms of their evolution, stability and biochemical functions under various physiochemical environments. Ultimately, natural and synthetic microbiomes can be manipulated and constructed for addressing global challenges including food security, climate change, human diseases and sustainable chemical productions. Chan obtained his B.S. in mathematics and physics at the University of Hong Kong and a Master of Philosophy in Computational Systems Biology at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He completed his Ph.D. in 2015 under the supervision of Peter Ruhdal Jensen at the Technical University of Denmark. Prior to joining CSU, Chan was a postdoctoral research scholar in Costas Maranas’ group at Pennsylvania State University.

Soham Ghosh, assistant professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering; core faculty member, C. Wayne McIlwraith Translational Medicine Institute

Soham Ghosh

Mechanical Engineering

Soham Ghosh is an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and a core faculty member of the C. Wayne McIlwraith Translational Medicine Institute. His primary research interest is in understanding the fundamental mechanobiological principles behind aging-related degenerative diseases of soft tissues and creating regenerative medicine technologies to manage those diseases, with a specific focus on nuclear mechanobiology, chromatin organization and epigenetic mechanisms. Ghosh is an active member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) – Bioengineering Division, the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), and the Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS). Ghosh received his B.E. in 2008 from Jadavpur University, M.Tech. in 2010 from the Indian Institute of Technology Madras, and Ph.D. in 2014 from Purdue University – all in mechanical engineering. Prior to joining CSU, Ghosh was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Colorado – Boulder.

Yanlin Guo, assistant professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

YaNlin Guo

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Yanlin Guo is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Her research expertise lies in the areas of real-time structural health monitoring, system identification and diagnosis, signal processing, structural dynamics and vibration, big data interpretation, remote sensing, and data-driven simulation and modeling of extreme winds. These research topics are applied to improving the life-long performance and resilience of structures subjected to both in-service loadings and multiple hazards. Guo completed her undergraduate studies in civil engineering at the Southeast University in Nanjing, China in 2007 and obtained a Master of Philosophy in civil engineering from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University in 2010. She received her Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Notre Dame in 2015. Prior to joining the faculty of CSU, Guo worked as a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Notre Dame and as a research scientist at Colorado State University.

Margarita Herrera-Alonso, associate professor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and School of Advanced Materials Discovery

Margarita Herrera-Alonso

Chemical and Biological Engineering

Margarita Herrera-Alonso is an associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and the School of Advanced Materials Discovery. Her research focuses on examining the molecular and process determinants of solution-based polymer assemblies. Her group’s ability to design, synthesize, and characterize well-defined polymers exhibiting unique chemical functionality and non-traditional molecular architectures, combined with techniques to carry out their assembly under controlled conditions, has allowed Herrera-Alonso’s team to produce novel nanoparticles used as carriers of pharmaceuticals and for stimuli-responsive delivery. Herrera-Alonso completed her undergraduate and Master of Science studies in chemical engineering at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) in 1999. She received her Ph.D. in polymer science and engineering from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2004, and was a postdoctoral research associate at Princeton University until 2007. She returned to UNAM as a postdoctoral research associate and lecturer, prior to joining the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University as an assistant professor in 2010.

James Hurrell, Department of Atmospheric Science; Walter Scott, Jr. Presidential Chair in Environmental Science and Engineering

James (Jim) Hurrell

Atmospheric Science

James Hurrell is a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Science and is the inaugural Walter Scott, Jr. Presidential Chair in Environmental Science and Engineering. Hurrell’s research centers on empirical and modeling studies and diagnostic analyses to better understand climate, climate variability, and climate change, and their impacts on a range of human and natural systems. He received his Ph.D. in atmospheric science from Purdue University in 1990. Before joining the faculty at CSU, Hurrell served as the director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, where he was also a senior scientist in the Climate and Global Dynamics Laboratory (CGD). He is the former chief scientist of community climate projects in CGD, which includes the Community Earth System Model (CESM), and a former director of CGD at the NCAR Earth System Laboratory. Hurrell also spent a year as a visiting scientist at the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research in the U.K.

Ryan Gary Kim, assistant professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Ryan Kim

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Ryan Gary Kim is an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. His research interests include the energy efficiency and scalability of manycore systems, machine learning for electronic design automation and computer architecture, and the design of scalable, fully adaptive systems assisted by machine learning. His work has been recognized with the 2018 Very Large Scale Integration Systems Best Paper Award. Kim received his B.S. (2011) and Ph.D. (2016) in computer engineering from Washington State University. Prior to joining CSU, he spent two years as a postdoctoral research associate at Carnegie Mellon University.

Peter Jan van Leeuwen, professor, Department of Atmospheric Science

Peter Jan van Leeuwen

Atmospheric Science

Peter Jan van Leeuwen is a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Science. His research focuses on the use of data assimilation and causality (cause and effect) inference for better understanding geophysical fluids, with emphasis on the atmosphere and ocean. This includes further development of data-assimilation methodology for highly nonlinear high-dimensional geophysical systems and of causality theory for these systems. van Leeuwen holds a B.S. in physics, astrophysics, and physics with chemistry from the University of Leiden, Netherlands. He attained his M.S. in theoretical physics in 1987 from the University of Amsterdam and his Ph.D. in fluid dynamics in 1992 from Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. Most recently, he was a professor in data assimilation at the University of Reading in the UK. He served as head of the Data Assimilation Research Centre (DARC), the largest academic data-assimilation center in the world; as interim director of the National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO) in the United Kingdom; and later as director of Data Assimilation Research at NCEO.

Kirk McGilvray, assistant professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering; Associate Director, Orthopaedic Bioengineering Research Laboratory

Kirk McGilvray

Mechanical Engineering

Kirk McGilvray is an assistant professor in the department of  Mechanical Engineering and Associate Director of the Orthopaedic Bioengineering Research Laboratory  (OBRL) at CSU. The OBRL uses state-of-the-art computational, in vitro, and in vivo experimental techniques to study the biomechanical etiology of orthopaedic disease states. Much of McGilvray’s recent research has been focused on the implementation of an implantable biocompatible micro-electric-mechanical system (bioMEMS) sensor that allows for the telemetric in vivo prediction of whether a bone fracture in a large animal model will go on to a full union before it can be detected radiographically. McGilvray received his B.S. in biomedical engineering in 2004 and both his M.S. (2005) and Ph.D. (2009) degrees in mechanical engineering from Colorado State University.

Erika Miller, assistant professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Systems Engineering

Erika Miller

Mechanical and Systems Engineering

Erika Miller is an assistant professor with appointments in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Systems Engineering. Her research is primarily centered on integrating humans with complex systems to enhance safety and performance in the design and evaluation of new and existing infrastructure. Miller’s work focuses on modeling human behavior and cognitive workload over time to evaluate the interactions between humans and machines, with an emphasis on developing appropriate trust and reliance between human operators and autonomous systems, particularly within the transportation domain. Her education and research background is in civil engineering, industrial and systems engineering, and transportation engineering. Miller received her B.S. degree in 2010 from Oregon State University and both her M.S. (2013) and Ph.D. (2018) from the University of Washington.

Mostafa Yourdkhani, assistant professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Mostafa Yourdkhani

Mechanical Engineering

Mostafa Yourdkhani is an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. His research interests and expertise include advanced manufacturing of composites, additive manufacturing of polymers, multi-functional materials, bio-inspired material design, polymer nanocomposites, polymer processing, and multiscale characterization and testing techniques. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from McGill University in 2014 in the area of polymer nanocomposites and composite materials. Prior to joining CSU, he was a postdoctoral research associate at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and a lecturer in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.