Dr. Gaofeng Jia

 

Honors and Awards

Dr. Aditi Bhaskar

 

Honors and Awards

Dr. Daniel Baker

 

Honors and Awards

Dr. Chester Watson

Emeritus Professor

Dr. Chester WatsonDr. Watson has practical experience as an engineer working in coal-fired steam generation electric power plants, as a utilities construction manager, in the design and survey for major river projects such as docks, pipeline crossings, mined land reclamation, and channel stabilization measures. He conducted approximately 25 floodplain information and flood insurance studies for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and FEMA. He was also in charge of numerous Hydrologic, Hydraulic, and Geomorphic studies for the Vicksburg, Mobile, Sacramento, and Memphis Districts of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Dr. Watson has been a reviewer of mine reclamation plans for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, specializing in hydraulic and geomorphologic related hazards. He also served as Principal Investigator for research projects involving erosional stability of watershed and stream systems, effectiveness of manufactured stream stabilization products, and river and stream restoration projects.

Technically, his emphasis has been on the analysis of watershed and channel system instability. He has given seminars to personnel of the Soil Conservation Service and Corps of Engineers incorporating geomorphic and hydraulic concepts. He has co-authored text books and has written chapters for other texts. Dr. Watson has conducted the geomorphology portions of the Waterways Experiment Station channel stabilization seminar, channel rehabilitation seminars for the U.S. EPA, and stream bank stabilization for IECA. He has been involved in a major research effort for Waterways Experiment Station, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to develop methods for rehabilitation of streams that have been destabilized due to land-use change and channelization. This project, the Demonstration Erosion Control project, is a long-term, comprehensive effort to control erosion and channel degradation. Numerous full-channel grade control structure, side-channel drop pipes, riprap bank stabilization, and bioengineering projects have been constructed. Dr. Watson was in charge of a group that intensively monitors the performance of the constructed features and the response of the channel to the emplaced features. Working with Waterways Experiment Station personnel and other participating groups, Dr. Watson has developed design, monitoring, and evaluation tools for channel stabilization. He has also participated in the development and testing of procedures that will include physical habitat features as a component of the channel stabilization design.

Other research includes development of guidelines for channel rehabilitation that will improve habitat value and maximize the natural reaeration capacity of the stream. Based on the natural reaeration capacity of the streams, Dr. Watson has conducted intensive physical model simulation of weir overfalls that could be used to improve the water quality of streams. Mathematical modeling has also been applied to assess the effect of using a stable channel morphology to improve a stream that was degraded by gravel dredging.

Dr. Watson’s primary teaching emphasis at Colorado State University was in Environmental River Mechanics (CE413). Research activities have provided funding for numerous graduate students. Dr. Watson has been a member of the Larimer County Floodplain Review Board as a volunteer service to the community.

Research Interests

  • River mechanics
  • Stream restoration
  • River hydraulics
  • Incised channels

Links to Other Information

Education

  • B.S. 1967, Louisiana Polytechnic Institute
  • M.S. 1972, Louisiana Tech University
  • Ph.D. 1982, Colorado State University

Dr. Thomas G. Sanders

Emeritus Professor

Dr. Tom SandersDr. Sanders’ achievements include, developing a mathematical model for the dewatering of sludge on sand beds, the first comprehensive investigation and research into the design of water quality monitoring networks(terms developed in the research are used in the field today), the design and construction of both an indoor and outdoor rainfall-runoff facility used for research, a mathematical model for nonpoint source movement in overland flow, low-flow research used by the state for managing streams in Colorado, developing the concept of work as a measure of the effectiveness of different erosion control materials, design and construction of an innovative and inexpensive road dust measuring device, the “Colorado State University Dustometer”, for research into the effectiveness of various dust suppressants and developing a methodology for comparing the effectiveness of different water quality monitoring network designs, a concept and procedure many years ahead if its time. He has been the PI or co-PI of 27 research contracts and grants totaling in excess of $5.8 M. Since 1979 and successfully presented over 85 short courses on Water Quality Monitoring Network Design, Hazardous Waste Management, Activated Sludge Process Control, Environmental Impacts of Water Research Projects, and Hydrology for Transportation Engineers and Hydrometry. The monitoring course has been presented six times overseas and seven times in other states. Sanders also presented one conference, in 1987, Waste Management Conference- Focus on the West.  He has 23 refereed publications, 20 invited papers, 19 chapters in books and other papers totaling 122.  Sanders has over 200 referenced citations (1990).  He was the editor and author of three books, Design of Networks for Monitoring Water Quality, Hydrology for Transportation Engineers, and Enter Karate and co-editor of Surface and Subsurface Hydrology and 7th Hydrology Days, 1987.

Research Interests

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Hydrology and water resources
  • Water quality monitoring network design
  • Non-point source pollution
  • Dust suppression

Links to Other Information

Education

  • B.S. 1966, Vanderbilt University – Civil Engineering
  • M.S. 1968, University of Massachusetts – Civil Engineering
  • Ph.D. 1974, University of Massachusetts – Civil Engineering

Dr. José D. Salas

Emeritus Professor

Dr. Jose SalasJosé D. Salas received his B.S. and C.E. degrees from the National University of Engineering of Lima, Perú. He specialized in water resources at Colorado State University (CSU), where he received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Dr. Salas has been Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at CSU during 1976-2011 and currently he is Professor Emeritus. He has about 45 years of experience in various aspects of water resources including hydrology, hydraulics, and water resources planning and management. Prior to joining CSU, Dr. Salas worked for the National Hydraulics Laboratory of Perú, the Irrigation Department of the Ministry of Agriculture of Perú, the University of Pittsburgh, and the Interamerican Center for Water and Land Development (CIDIAT), Venezuela. At CSU Dr. Salas was responsible for teaching and research in the general area of hydrology and water resources. He taught a number of undergraduate and graduate courses, organized and taught short courses and training programs, and supervised (advisor) of 43 M.S. and 37 Ph.D. students. Dr. Salas has been principal investigator of research projects related to: flood prediction, drought analysis and prediction, stochastic modeling and generation of hydrologic processes, water supply forecasting, prediction of short term rainfall, impacts of climatic changes on agriculture, modeling streamflow in arid regions, modeling and simulation of the Nile River System, modeling and simulation of the Great Lakes System, operation and safety studies of reservoir systems, and stochastic hydrology of the Colorado River system. These projects have been funded by national and international organizations such as the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station, NOAA, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the World Bank. Additionally, Dr. Salas’ research includes developing mathematical models for predicting the breach of earth dams, the conceptual modeling of watershed processes, determining the uncertainty of reservoir sedimentation, quantifying the uncertainty of sediment load, and risk analysis and modeling of extreme events under nonstationary conditions. Dr. Salas has been consultant of several organizations such as the U.S. NSF; Northwest Hydraulics Consultants, Inc., Seattle, Washington; Resource Consultants Inc., Colorado; W.W. Wheeler and Associates, Englewood, Colorado; Wright Water Engineers, Denver, Colorado; West Coast Regional Water Supply Authority, Florida; AYRES Associates, Colorado; Riverside Technology Inc., Colorado; Tampa Bay Water, Florida; and MWH, Denver, Colorado. Likewise, Dr. Salas has been involved in research, teaching, and consulting activities for a number of international organizations such as UNESCO, AID, FAO, HydroQuebec (Montreal, Canada), ACRES International Ltd.(Niagara Falls, Canada), IICA, CIDIAT, Disaster Risk Management Inc., Nippon Koei Co., and the World Bank. International work experience includes countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Guatemala, India, Italy, Korea, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Dr. Salas has been a member of numerous professional societies including, The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), The American Geophysical Union (AGU), The American Water Resources Association, and The International Association of Hydraulic Research. He has been Associate Editor of the Journal of the Hydraulics Division of the ASCE, member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Hydrologic Engineering of ASCE, Revista del Agua of Spain, Ingenieria Hidraulica of Mexico, and Associate Editor of the Journal of Hydrology. He was awarded the 1996 Arid Lands Hydraulic Engineering Award from ASCE, the 1998 Abell Engineering Faculty Research Award from CSU College of Engineering, the 2003 CSU/AGU Hydrology Days Award, the 2004 Research Award from CSU Civil Engineering Dept., the 2005 Antorcha de Habich Award from the National University of Engineering, Lima, Peru, the 2009 Partners in Conservation Award by the U.S. Dep. of the Interior, and the 2010 V.T. Chow Award from ASCE. He is corresponding member of the Academy of Engineering of Mexico and the Academy of Engineering of Peru. He has written over 250 scientific and technical papers and reports, he is the main author of the book, “Applied Modeling of Hydrologic Time Series”, WRP, Colorado, 484 p., wrote Chapter 19, McGraw Hill Handbook of Hydrology, 1993, authored and co-authored several other chapters in books & handbooks, and has contributed to the development of the software SAMS (stochastic analysis, modeling and simulation).

Research Interests

  • Flood prediction
  • Drought characterization
  • Long range streamflow forecasting
  • Stochastic analysis and simulation of hydrologic processes
  • Risk analysis and modeling of extreme events under non-stationary conditions

Links to Other Information

Education

  • B.S. 1965, National University of Engineering, LimaPeru – Civil Engineering-Hydraulic Eng
  • M.S. 1967, Colorado State University – Hydraulics
  • Ph.D. 1972, Colorado State University – Hydrology and Water Resources

Dr. Larry Roesner

Emeritus Professor

Dr. Larry RoesnerDr. Roesner has more than 40 years of experience in water resources and water quality engineering and management. He is a nationally recognized expert in the development and application of hydrologic, hydraulic, and water quality simulation models.

Dr. Roesner held the endowed Harold H. Short Chair of Civil Engineering Infrastructure Systems at Colorado State University.

Research Interests

  • Stormwater managment for geomorphic and ecologic protection of urban streams
  • Graywater reuse in urban areas
  • Sustainable urban water resource systems

Links to Other Information

Education

  • B.S. 1963, Valparaiso – Civil Engineering
  • M.S. 1965, Colorado State University – Hydrology
  • Ph.D. 1969, University of Washington – Sanitary Engineering

Dr. Johannes Gessler

Emeritus Professor

 

Dr. Johannes Gessler

Dr. Gessler retired in 2003 after having been associated with Colorado State University for 37 years.  Over that period of time he served the Department and College in many different ways: as a faculty member, as Associate Department Head, as Interim Department Head, since 1990 as Associate Dean, and for a couple of years (1997-1999) as Interim Dean.  So what after retirement?

Since then he taught a couple of courses (Statics and Hydraulic Engineering) at times when the department was short handed.  Perhaps more important, he continued to serve the College of Engineering as coordinator for students who are interested in the Study Abroad Program.  He made presentations to freshmen students on opportunities related to Study Abroad, presented individuals with various alternatives, and helped them in the planning process.

Engineering has become a very internationalized professional field.   Many of our students will work on international projects, or work with civil engineers in other countries.  Consequently, Gessler feels that the number of students to study abroad should be more like 20-25%.  Shortly before his retirement Johannes was instrumental in creating an International Engineering option within the Engineering Science major.  Students in this option concentrate their engineering studies in one of the traditional engineering fields, and supplement this curriculum with various courses in International Studies.

Research Interests

  • Fluid mechanics
  • Hydraulics
  • Erosion
  • Sedimentation

Links to Other Information

Education

  • Dr.sc.techn. (equivalent to Ph.D.), Hydraulic Engineering
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland, 1966
  • Diploma (equivalent to B.S. degree), Civil Engineering
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, 1960
  • Extensive course work in graduate level Statistics courses
    Colorado State University

Overland Flow

Research on overland flow has started in Canada as my part of my own thesis and dissertation topics. More recent research on overland flow has been funded by ARO and ARL since 1986. Some of the papers below refer to the overland flow characteristics from raindrop impact to sheet flows, roll waves and the applicability of simplified equations of motion.

Surface runoff modeling

Surface runoff modeling has been the emphasis of our activities within the Center for Geosciences. This on-going project has been funded by ARO and ARL since 1986. We have developed numerical algorithms for the simulation of rainfall-runoff using GIS terrain data, raingages and/or radar rainfall precipitation. The model CASC2D has been developed at CSU by Dr. Julien in collaboration with numerous students including Drs. Bahram Saghafian, Fred Ogden, Bill Doe, Darcy Molnar, Amit Sharma, Billy Johnson, and Jeff Jorgeson, who completed their Ph.D. studies at CSU. The most recent version of the model is CASC2D-SED which simulates soil erosion from overland flow and routes sediment by size fractions to the outlet of a watershed. Rosalia Rojas is pursuing new developments with the model CASC2D-SED is under further development to determine the effect of grid size in the calculations of soil erosion.

Upland Erosion

Research on upland erosion has started in Canada as my part of my own thesis and dissertation topics. More recent research on overland flow has been funded by ARO and ARL since 1986. Some of the papers below refer to the modeling with CASC2D-SED and the transfroms for the analysis of flow and sediment duration curves. The most recent version of the model is CASC2D-SED which simulates soil erosion from overland flow and routes sediment by size fractions to the outlet of a watershed. Rosalia Rojas is pursuing new developments with the model CASC2D-SED is under further development to determine the effect of grid size in the calculations of soil erosion.

Alluvial Channels

This on-going project started during the author’s post-doctoral studies and has been recently funded by the USBR since 1996. We have developed a method for the determination of the downstream hydraulic geometry of alluvial channels. The research has been carried out in collaboration with J. Wargadalam, Claudia Leon, Travis Bauer and Gigi Richard, who received graduate degrees at CSU.

Resistance to Flow and Bedforms

The analysis of resistance to flow and bedforms has been the subject of research in collaboration with Delft Hydraulics and the USBR. The analysis of bedform geometry and resistance to flow has been the author’s research topic during his two sabbaticals in 1991 and 2000. Research on the Rhine River has been in collaboration with Gerrit Klaassen at Delft Hydraulics. Additional research at CSU has been carried out by Y. Raslan during the course of his Ph.D degree at CSU.

Local Scour

Research on local scour has been intermittent with interest from USDA for the analysis of rill erosion and interest from FHWA for the analysis of pier scour and scour below drop structures. The investigations have been performed in collaboration with N.l Bormann, O. Stein, and C. Santoro, who received degrees from CSU.

Sediment Transport

This analysis of sediment transport in rivers has been a primary research area since 1977. First studies relate to sediment transport in canadian rivers in collaboration with marcel Frenette. Recent investigations refer to the mechanics of sediment transport. The research results available here refer to the studies in collaboration with Hyoseop Woo, Junke Guo, and Otto Stein who received graduate degrees from CSU. This web site contains numerous papers and technical notes on published results. The analysis of hyperconcentration, mudflows and debris flows is available in a separate item below.

Mudflows and Debris Flows

Research on hyperconcentrations, mudflows and debris flows in mountain streams has been on-going since 1983. Research has been carried out in collaboration with J. O’Brien, H. Woo, Y. Lan and J. Guo who not only manifested great interest in the topic, but also earned Ph.D. degrees at CSU. The photos of the recent devastating flows in Venezuela were prepared in collaboration with Claudia Leon and Rosalia Rojas, both curent Ph.D. candidates at CSU.

 

Dr. Terence Podmore

Emeritus Professor

 

Dr. Terence H. Podmore is an Emeritus Professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Colorado State University with a specialization in irrigation and drainage engineering. Dr. Podmore taught courses in irrigation design and management, and drainage and wetlands engineering. In addition, he has taught numerous graduate and undergraduate courses on a variety of irrigation topics. Dr. Podmore’s research focused on evaluation of irrigation systems; automation of irrigation including surge irrigation; infiltration mechanics under irrigation and irrigation applications in developing countries; drainage of irrigated land and integrated irrigation and drainage systems; water use and management in agricultural and urban environments; and environmental impacts of agricultural water management. Dr. Podmore served as Co-Director of the Colorado Institute for Irrigation Management (CIIM). He has designed and conducted numerous irrigation short courses and special training programs in irrigation and drainage. CIIM conducts short courses and technical assistance activities in irrigation and drainage domestically and internationally. Recent work included cooperating with the Navajo Nation on developing irrigation management organizations and improving the effectiveness of irrigation systems. Dr. Podmore has worked on irrigation related activities in several countries around the world including Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Uzbekistan and Zimbabwe. His work has included the evaluation of existing irrigation systems, design and modification of irrigation and drainage systems and development of irrigation water management plans.

Research Interests

  • Irrigation and drainage
  • Agricultural water management
  • Groundwater
  • Water resource systems

Links to Other Information

Education

  • B.S. 1967, National College of Agricultural Engineering – Agricultural Engineering
  • M.S. 1969, Michigan State University – Agricultural Engineering
  • Ph.D. 1975, Purdue University – Agricultural Engineering