Publications

  1. Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, MacDonald LH. 2019. Spatial and temporal patterns of sediment storage and erosion following a wildfire and extreme flood. Earth Surface Dynamics. (link).
  2. Brogan DJ, MacDonald LH, Nelson PA, Morgan JA. 2019. Geomorphic complexity and sensitivity in channels to fire and floods in mountain catchments. Geomorphology 337: 53-68. (link).
  3. Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, MacDonald LH. 2017. Reconstructing extreme post-wildfire floods: a comparison of convective and mesoscale events. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 42: 2505-2522. (link).
  4. Morgan JA, Brogan DJ, Nelson PA. 2016. Application of structure-from-motion photogrammetry in laboratory flumes. Geomorphology 276: 125-143. (link)
  5. Cotrufo MF, Boot CM, Kampf SK, Nelson PA, Brogan DJ, Covino T, Haddix ML, MacDonald LH, Rathburn S, Ryan S, Schmeer S, Hall EK. 2016. Redistribution of pyrogenic carbon from hillslopes to stream sediments following a large sub-alpine wildfire. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 30, doi:10.1002/2016GB005467. (link)
  6. Scott DN, Brogan DJ, Lininger KB, Schook DM, Daugherty EE, Sparacino MS, Patton AI. 2016. Evaluating survey instruments and methods in a steep channel. Geomorphology 273: 236-243. (link)
  7. Kampf SK, Brogan DJ, Schmeer S, MacDonald LH, Nelson PA. 2016. How do geomorphic effects of rainfall vary with storm type and spatial scale in a post-fire landscape? Geomorphology 273: 39-51. (link)


Conference Presentations and Proceedings

  1. MacDonald LH, Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, Kampf SK, and Wagenbrenner JW. 2019. Scaling post-fire effects from hillslopes to watersheds: processes, problems, and implications. Proceedings of the Joint Federal Interagency Conference on Sedimentation and Hydrologic Modeling. Reno, NV. 24-28 June.
  2. MacDonald LH, Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, Kampf SK, and Wagenbrenner JW. 2019. Scaling post-fire effects from hillslopes to watersheds: processes, problems, and implications. Presented at the Fire Continuum Conference. Missoula, MT. 21-24 May.
  3. MacDonald LH, Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, Kampf SK, and Wagenbrenner JW. 2019. Scaling post-fire effects from hillslopes to watersheds: processes, problems, and implications. Presented at AGU 38th Annual Hydrology Days Conference. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 19-21 March.
  4. Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, MacDonald LH, and Morgan JA. 2017. Geomorphic complexity of sequential fire and floods in mountain watersheds. Presented at 2017 AGU fall meeting. New Orleans, LA. 11-15 December.
  5. Morgan JA, Nelson PA, Brogan DJ. 2017. Hydro-geomorphology of the middle Elwha River, Washington, following dam removal. Presented at 2017 AGU fall meeting. New Orleans, LA. 11-15 December.
  6. Kampf SK, MacDonald LH, Saavedra F, Wilson C, Schmeer S, Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, and Gannon B. 2017. Erosion and sediment delivery to streams following wildfire: Processes and predictions. Presented at the 2017 UCOWR/NIWR Annual Conference. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 13-15 June.
  7. Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, MacDonald LH, and Morgan JA. 2017. How disturbing: The complications of sequential fire and floods in mountain catchments. Presented at AGU 37th Annual Hydrology Days Conference. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 20-22 March. [Abstract]
  8. Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, and MacDonald LH. 2016. How do Watershed Characteristics and Precipitation Influence Post-wildfire Valley Sediment Storage and Delivery Over Time? Presented at 2016 AGU fall meeting. San Francisco, CA. 12-16 December.
  9. Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, and MacDonald LH. 2016. How do watershed characteristics influence post-fire sediment storage and delivery over time? Presented at 2016 GSA fall meeting. Denver, CO. 25-28 September. [Abstract]
  10. MacDonald LH, Kampf S, Brogan DJ, Schmeer S, Nelson P. 2016. Comparing and Linking Post-fire Hillslope Erosion and Channel Change for Different Storm Types. Presentation for 2016 Fall Meeting, EGU. Vienna, Austria. 17-22 April. [Abstract]
  11. Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, and MacDonald LH. 2015. Quantifying erosion and deposition patterns using airborne LiDAR folowing the 2012 High Park Fire and 2013 Colorado Flood. Presented at 2015 AGU fall meeting. San Francisco, CA. 14-18 December. [PDF]
  12. Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, and MacDonald LH. 2015. Estimating and comparing two extreme post-wildfire peak flows in the Colorado Front Range. Presented at AGU 35th Annual Hydrology Days Conference. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 23-25 March. [PDF]
  13. Boot CM, Cotrufo MF, Haddix ML, Schmeer S, Kampf SK, Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, Rhoades CC, Ryan-Burkett S, Rathburn S, and Hall EK. 2014. Transport of Black Carbon Across the TerrestrialAquatic Interface Following Wildfire: Contributions of Short and Long-term Controls. Abstract B41L-06, 2014 AGU fall meeting, San Francisco, Calif., 15-19 December. [PDF]
  14. Kampf SK, Schmeer S, MacDonald LH, Brogan DJ, Nelson PA. 2014 Flooding after fire: Impacts of the 2013 Colorado Front Range floods on the High Park Fire burn scar. Abstract H54D-08, 2014 AGU fall meeting, San Francisco, Calif., 15-19 December.
  15. Brogan DJ, and Nelson PA. 2014.. A hydrologic and geomorphic comparison of two extreme postwildfire floods in the Colorado Front Range. 69th Annual Meeting of the Rocky Mountain Hydrologic Research Center, Wild Basin Lodge, Allenspark, CO. 24 October. [PDF]
  16. Dozier A, Brogan DJ, Leipzig-Scott P, Fitzpatrick, R. 2014. Implications of flood response decision support framework on making room-for-the-river: A case study of the St. Vrain Creek. 2014 AGU Hydrology Days. [PDF]
  17. Stone BH, Lefsky MA, Rocca M, Romme W, Sibold J, Filippelli S, and Brogan DJ. 2014. Pre-fire beetle damage and fire severity interaction in the High Park burn area. 20th Annual Front Range Student Ecology Symposium. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 19 February. [PDF]
  18. Stone BH, Lefsky MA, Rocca M, Romme W, Sibold J, Filippelli S, and Brogan DJ. 2014. re-fire beetle damage and fire severity interaction in the High Park burn area. High Park & Hewlett Fire Studies Update meeting. USGS Fort Collins Science Center, Fort Collins, CO, 11 February.
  19. Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, and MacDonald LH. 2013. Reconstruction of a geomorphically-effective flood following the 2012 High Park Fire. Abstract 233667. Poster presented at 125th Annual GSA meeting. Denver, CO, 27-30 October. [PDF]
  20. Brogan DJ, Nelson PA, and MacDonald LH. 2013. Runoff, erosion, and channel change following the High Park Fire. Poster presented at AGU Chapman Conference. Estes Park, CO, 26-30 August. [PDF]
  21. MacDonald LH, Wagenbrenner JW, Nelson PA, and Brogan DJ. 2013. Predicting post-fire flooding and sediment delivery at the watershed scale: An urgent need for upscaling. Presentation for 2013 Fall Meeting, EGU. Vienna, Austria. 7-12 April. [PDF]
  22. Brogan DJ, Schmeer S, Kampf SK, MacDonald LH, and Nelson PA. 2013. Quantification of Postwildfire Hydrologic Response, Hillslope Erosion, and Channel Morphology: Baseline Data Following the High Park Fire. Presented at AGU 33rd Annual Hydrology Days Conference. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. 25-27 March. [PDF]
  23. Schmeer S, Brogan DJ, Kampf SK, MacDonald LH, Nelson PA, and Rathburn S. 2012. Runoff, Erosion, and Channel Change Following the High Park Fire Poster. High Park Fire Symposium. Fort Collins, CO. . [PDF]
  24. Fassnacht SR, Brogan DJ, Sexstone GA, Jasinski M, López-Moreno JI, and Skordahl M. 2012. Spatio-Temporal Variability of Snowpack Properties: Comparing Operational, Field, and ICESat Remote Sensing Data over Northern Colorado, United States. Proceedings of the IGARSS International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium 2012. Munich, Germany. 1576-1577. [PDF]




Most of my present research has taken place in two watersheds that were burned in the 2012 High Park Fire (HPF), Skin Gulch and Hill Gulch. Both watersheds are roughly 15 km2 in size, drain north into the Cache la Poudre watershed, and were burned at approximately 65% moderate to high severity. The geology is primarily Precambrian metasedimentary and metaigneous schists, gneisses, and plutonic igneous rocks. The vegetation prior to the fire was primarily ponderosa pine and the region receives about 450-550 mm of precipitation annually, with most of the precipitation from November to May falling as snow. Research in the HPF has included estimating and comparing two extreme peak flows in Skin Gulch, an analysis on the geomorphic effects of rainfall-runoff events at hillslope and watershed scales, quantification of erosion and deposition patterns using airborne lidar, use of Doppler NEXRAD radar to quantify the amount and spatial patterns of precipitation, and collection of soil samples to understand the redistribution of pyrogenic carbon. The rainfall-runoff events that we have monitored point to how high and moderate severity forest fires can dramatically increase peak flows and alter channel morphology.


Below are a few figures related to the research we are doing.




Title: Geomorphic effects of rainfall-runoff events at hillslope and watershed scales in a post-fire landscape
Stephanie K. Kampf, Daniel J. Brogan, Sarah Schmeer, Lee H. MacDonald, and Peter A. Nelson

Abstract

In post-fire landscapes, increased susceptibility to soil erosion can lead to rapid geomorphic change. We examine how different types of rainfall events affected hillslope-scale erosion and watershed-scale channel change in two 14-16 km2 watersheds draining the 2012 High Park Fire burn area in northern Colorado, USA. In 2013, these watersheds experienced a sequence of spatially variable summer convective rain storms followed by a week-long spatially extensive storm in September. Using rainfall, erosion, and channel cross section monitoring, we compared the rainfall characteristics, sediment yield, stream stage, and channel geometry changes for the summer storms to those of the extreme September storm. Twelve summer storms produced hillslope erosion, and most of these storms primarily affected only one study watershed. Maximum rainfall intensities during the summer storms exceeded those of the September storm in many locations. The September storm had less spatial variability, covered both study watersheds, and its depth of precipitation was greater than the depth from all the summer storms combined. Hillslope erosion was higher during the summer storms in sites that experienced the highest intensity summer rains and higher during the September storm for locations that had less summer erosion. Hillslope sediment yield correlated with depths of precipitation above high intensity thresholds, indicating that most erosion was from infiltration excess overland flow. Both summer storms and the September storm changed channel cross section geometry, but the magnitude of change was greatest during the September storm, when the watersheds experienced upstream incision and downstream aggradation. Stage records indicate that most of this channel change occurred during a two-day period of highest intensity precipitation. Although maximum rainfall intensities for the September storm were not as high as some of the summer convective storms, the spatial extent of the storm combined with the extended duration of rain exceeding thresholds for overland flow generation led to a longer period of elevated runoff and more extensive channel change.



Below are a few figures from the manuscript.

A significant amount of my research has been focused on the quantification of geomorphic change using high resolution topography (HRT). I'm currently working on results and will have more details on here soon. This is my first year attending AGU and will have a poster in the EP51B: Morphodynamics of fluvial, aeolian, hillslope, and coastal environments characterized using high-resolution topography and bathymetry session. If this research interests you please feel free to stop by the poster hall in Moscone South 08:00 - 12:20 on Friday, 18 December 2015!


Title: Quantifying erosion and deposition patterns using airborne LiDAR following the 2012 High Park Fire and 2013 Colorado Flood
Daniel J. Brogan, Peter A. Nelson, and Lee H. MacDonald

Quantifying and predicting geomorphic change over large spatial scales is increasingly feasible and of growing interest as repeat high resolution topography becomes available. We began detailed field studies of channel geomorphic change using RTK-GPS in two 15 km2 watersheds following the 2012 High Park Fire; the watersheds were then subjected to a several-hundred year flood in September 2013. During this time a series of airborne LiDAR datasets were collected, and the objectives of this study were to: 1) determine and compare the spatial variability in channel and valley erosion and deposition over time from the LiDAR; and 2) determine if the observed changes can be predicted from channel and valley bottom characteristics. Data quality issues in the initial LiDAR required us to rotate and translate flight lines in order to co-register ground-classified point clouds between successive datasets; uncertainty was then estimated using our RTK-GPS field measurements. Topographic changes were calculated using the Multiscale Model to Model Cloud Comparison (M3C2) algorithm. Results indicate that the 2013 flood mobilized much more sediment than was mobilized due to the fire alone; unfortunately the uncertainty in differencing is still frequently greater than the observed changes, especially within transfer reaches. Valley expansion and constriction are major controls on spatial patterns of erosion and deposition, suggesting that topographic metrics such as longitudinal distributions of channel slope and valley confinement may provide quasi-physically based estimates of sediment deposition and delivery potential.

Peter A. Nelson (personal website) and I are using Doppler NEXRAD radar data to acquire spatially distributed rainfall. We have worked with both single polarization and dual polarization datasets, as well as data from the Cheyenne, WY weather station (KCYS) and the Denver, CO weather station (TDEN).






This page is under construction, please check back soon.






Structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry is a technique of using overlapping photographs to create a 3D point cloud. Jacob A. Morgan, Peter A. Nelson and I conducted an analysis to demonstrate the accuracy of SfM in a laboratory setting (link). Results indicate that SfM does as well as, if not better, than terrestrial laser scanning, and a minimum of 100 camera pixels per grain is necessary if sub-grain scale topography is desired.





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Additionally our lab built a field setup for collecting river topography using SfM, which consists of a Canon T3i with a 24mm fixed lens mounted on a painters pole. We purchased a remote and a 12' extension cable that was compatible with Canon cameras. Additionally we have used a Canon point-and-shoot camera (PowerShot ELPH110HS). For this camera we are using CHDK in conjuction with a custom remote. Our remote design followed an example from James Dietrich's personal website. Jacob A. Morgan and I have also put together a tutorial on how to use the VisualSFM software, which can be found [here].


Over a three year period I aided on a project analyzing the effect of change in sediment supply on pool-riffle sequencing following the removal of the Glines Canyon Dam on the Elwha River, WA. Please feel free to check out Jacob Morgan's webpage for more information, and enjoy some pictures from the beautiful study site below.




Below is a growing list of resources that I and/or colleagues have put together to aid in analyzing data. In no way are we to be held responsible or accountable for the use of these tools. All copyright (c) is for the original producer(s). Please feel free to use and/or modify them under the terms terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, please see http://www.gnu.org/licenses.

  • How to VisualSFM tutorial [Link]
  • Dr. Gary Parker's AgDegNormGravMixPW workbook written in Python [Link]
  • Matlab script to georeference total station data [Link]