What is the Difference Between
Biomedical Science and Biomedical Engineering?

The short answer is that Biomedical engineers take and use more math! There is, however, more to it than that. The two fields are very similar in that they are both transdisciplinary and apply scientific principles to healthcare. The chart below will help explain some of the differences:

Biomedical Sciences

Biomedical Engineering

Looks at ‘What’ ‘Why’ and/or ‘How’ something happens.

 

Looks at ‘So what?’ ‘What can we do?’ ‘How can we make something? ‘

Investigation-oriented

Problem-solving oriented

Scientists are generally more interested in the “Research” of “Research and Development.”

Engineers are generally more about the “Development” in “Research and Development,” though there is also an element of research, if you'd like to pursue that.

Career Paths include

Research at the federal level, in institutions of higher education, and in the private sector. In particular, exciting opportunities exist in biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and other biomedical and health related areas to include specialties in human and veterinary medicine.

 

Combinations of research and teaching opportunities.

 

Further studies in professional and graduate programs such as medicine, veterinary medicine, physician assistant, pharmacy, dentistry, optometry, chiropractic medicine, and physical therapy.

 

Become Research Scientists, Chief Scientific Officers or other scientists who work with large and small companies, solving scientific problems, developing and/or manufacturing products.

 

Career paths include: 

Research to develop and evaluate systems and products such as artificial organs, prostheses (artificial devices that replace missing body parts), instrumentation, medical information systems, health management, and care delivery systems.

 

 

Combinations of research and teaching opportunities.

 

Attend Graduate, medical, veterinary school or other advanced programs of study.

 

Design devices used in various medical procedures (e.g. hip or knee replacements or artificial heart valves), imaging systems such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and devices for automating insulin injections or controlling body functions.

 

Become Research Engineers, Chief Scientific Officers or other scientists/engineers who work with large and small companies, solving engineering problems, developing and/or manufacturing products.