School of Biomedical Engineering FAQs

 

What is Biomedical Engineering?

What is the difference between Biomedical Engineering and Biomedical Science?

What is the Difference between a major and the ISP in biomedical engineering?

What is the Undergraduate Certificate?

Why would I want to join the Certificate Program?

What is the difference between the BME bachelor’s degree program and getting a bachelor’s in a traditional engineering major and a master’s degree in biomedical engineering?

What is the difference between the Master of Engineering and Master of Science degrees?

How does the Master of Engineering distance education program compare to the on campus program?

What types of funding are available?

What opportunities will be available after graduation?

How can I get involved in student organizations?

How do I apply for the program?

Are there prerequisites to applying?

How do I prepare for and decide on graduate/medical/dental schools?

What courses are offered in Biomedical Engineering?

How do I choose an advisor?

Who makes up my committee?

What are the research areas in the School and what opportunities will there be for me to do research?

How do I plan a visit?

How do I contact the School?

What is Biomedical Engineering?

Biomedical engineering is one of the fastest growing occupations. Learn why!

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What is the Difference between a major and the ISP in biomedical engineering?

It really depends on what you want and what you want to do after you graduate. The Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering will provide much more depth and breadth than majoring in one area and getting the ISP (minor) in biomedical engineering. If you would rather have a major course of study in one area (this could be engineering or a non-engineering major) and have a taste of biomedical engineering, the major/ISP route may be the best way for you to go. Your advisers can help you decide this, too.

What is the Undergraduate Certificate?

The School of Biomedical Engineering (SBME) Undergraduate Certificate is a 21 credit program, similar to a minor. It is open to all majors at CSU and is designed to introduce undergraduate students to biomedical engineering and build foundational skills in engineering and science. More information and curriculum sheets

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Why would I want to join the Certificate Program?

The Certificate program allows students to have depth in a life science or engineering discipline and demonstrate breadth through completion of this interdisciplinary program. Students are marketable in many different industries and more competitive applicants for graduate school as well as medical, dental, and law schools.

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DualDegree-vs-DegreeAndISP What is the difference between majoring in biomedical engineering and getting the Interdisciplinary Studies Program (ISP)?

It really depends on what you want and what you want to do after you graduate. The Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering will provide much more depth and breadth than majoring in one area and getting the ISP (minor) in biomedical engineering. If you would rather have a major course of study in one area (this could be engineering or a non-engineering major) and have a taste of biomedical engineering, the major/ISP route may be the best way for you to go. Your advisers can help you decide this, too.

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What is the difference between the dual bachelor’s degree program and getting a bachelor’s in a traditional engineering major and a master’s degree in biomedical engineering?

Again, it really depends on what you want. The Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering is designed to be very transdisciplinary and to integrate the traditional engineering major with biomedical engineering. There are many hands-on applications in the classes and labs. Your senior design project will bring all this together in a team-project environment that will give you more hands-on and integrated experiences with the BME bachelor’s degree.  A bachelor/master’s degree combination may provide depth in the bachelor’s area and a biomedical engineering overlay. At the master’s level, students traditionally pursue research based on the adviser’s projects, which also provides depth. This option leaves it up to you to integrate your courses of study. Either way you go, you would be well-prepared to apply for PhD programs
Again, we recommend you work with an adviser to decide which course might be best for YOU.

 

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What is the difference between the Master of Engineering and Master of Science degrees?

The Master of Engineering degree is a course work only degree program that provides students a foundation in Biomedical Engineering and is often used for professional development and advancement in the field. The Master of Science(M.S.)degree is a research-based degree which requires the student to complete a research project leading to the successful defense of a thesis. The M.S. is often pursued by students who wish to do research in industry or continue on to their Ph.D.

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How does the Master of Engineering distance education program compare to the on campus program?

The Master of Engineering (M.E.) distance education program has a similar curriculum to the on-campus program, with fewer electives (online curriculum is pending approval). Students have the opportunity to view the same lectures on-campus students attend and interact with world-class faculty. The diploma will be identical to that earned by on-campus students.

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What types of funding are available?

For undergraduate students, there are many scholarship opportunities at the University and college levels. For graduate students, the department, graduate school, and many outside entities offer full or partial support based on completed applications. There are also many funding opportunities through the Graduate School and other organizations associated with the University.

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What opportunities will be available after graduation?

Undergraduate students continue on to graduate school, medical, dental, or law school, and successful careers in a wide variety of industries. The employment outlook for biomedical engineering graduates with Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees is one of the best across all industries in the US

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How can I get involved in student organizations?

Within the 4 colleges associated with SBME, there are over 15 biomedical engineering related student organizations. In addition, there are over 100 student organizations at the University.

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How do I apply for the program?

Graduate students must submit a complete application package to the department, the graduate school application, and the $50 application fee. Undergraduate students need to meet with an advisor in the SBME office to learn more about the certificate program.

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Are there prerequisites to applying?

Students are admitted to both the undergraduate and graduate program from all majors. Applicants for the graduate program may be required to take background classes including calculus I, II, and III, differential equations, chemistry, biology and anatomy/physiology.

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How do I prepare for and on graduate/medical/dental schools?

The advisors in the SBME office are always happy to speak with you about what to consider when looking at graduate school options. Some helpful web sites include: www.gradschools.com, www.petersons.com, http://graduate-school.phds.org, www.graduatingengineer.com/higher-education/ and www.ets.org

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What courses are offered in Biomedical Engineering?

Curriculum sheets are available for the undergraduate minor as well as the four pathways to a Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering: Pathway C (chemical & biological engineering coursework), Pathway E (electical engineering coursework), Pathway L (electrical engineering - lasers & optics coursework), and Pathway M (mechanical engineering coursework). In addition, we also offer M.S., and Ph.D. degrees. You can also search the class schedule from the Registrar’s Page to find all the courses being offered in the current and near future semesters throughout the University.

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How do I choose an advisor?

Undergraduate students will work with their home department to determine a faculty or staff advisor. Students will also be advised by an SBME advisor who will help them progress in their biomedical engineering curriculum and research internships, careers, and other post-graduate opportunities in the field.

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Graduate students will select an advisor based on their research interests . You can learn more about faculty research areas by searching and reviewing our faculty page. Two to three Ph.D. students will have an opportunity to complete lab rotations , allowing them to work with three different professors before choosing an area of study and faculty advisor.

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Who makes up my committee?

The committee must consist of at least three faculty members for a master’s degree program and at least four for a doctoral degree program. The members are as follows:
1) the adviser who serves as chairperson of the committee and who must hold academic faculty rank as a professor, associate professor, or assistant professor of any appointment type within the department or program (Core Faculty Member) granting the degree;
2) one or more additional members from the department (Core Faculty Member);
3) any nondepartmental faculty member who may be appropriate (non-Core Faculty Member);
4) one member from an outside department who, appointed by the Vice Provost for Graduate Studies, represents the Graduate School.  The outside committee member appointed by the Vice Provost for Graduate Studies must hold a regular, special,  transitional, joint, or emeritus/emerita faculty appointment at Colorado State University. (The outside member cannot be a Core Faculty Member nor from your Advisor’s home department)

Individuals who are not academic faculty but who have special expertise may serve on committees in addition to the prescribed members, but may not vote regarding examination results.

For more information on your committee, see the Graduate Bulletin.

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What are the research areas in the School and what opportunities will there be for me to do research?

SBME’s main research areas include: biomechanics and biomaterials; molecular, cellular, and tissues engineering; and medical diagnostics and imaging. More detail can be found on our research areas page. Undergraduate and graduate students have a wide variety of research opportunities with faculty labs in 14 different departments across campus funded by industry and governmental agencies.

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How do I plan a visit?

Potential undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to visit SBME, CSU, and Fort Collins at any time. Please contact us to set up a time to visit. Graduate students should review the faculty page and let us know if you would like to meet any of them during your time on campus.

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How do I contact the School?

Please contact us at any time! You can also reach us at 970.491.7157. We look forward to hearing from you

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