Engineering Network Services - CSU

Engineering Network Services
 

How To Connect To A Remote Linux Server

Some things to know first:

Connect with Remote Desktop (recommended)

    From a Thin Client or Lab PC

    • The Remote Desktop Connection app is installed on the ENS Windows computers in the labs, including the Windows Desktop on the thin clients. Please note that currently only versions 3.5.0-7 or 3.5.0-9 work with our linux servers.
    • There is no need to connect to the Engineering Labs or Mobile Desktop first; Remote Desktop is available directly from the Start Menu of the Wyse Client.
    1. Open Remote Desktop Connection from the Start Menu. (Tip: Click the Windows button and type 'remote'. When you see the program name, click on it.)
    2. The Remote Desktop Connection window will open.
    3. For "Computer", type the name or alias of one of the Linux servers.
    4. If a dialog box appears asking about the authenticity of the host, answer Yes.
    5. The Linux "xrdp" logon screen will open. Enter your Engineering login name and password, then click Login.
    6. If a window asking for the root password appears, you may close it or click "cancel".
    7. You will see the desktop of the Linux server. Perform your work on the Linux server as necessary.
    8. When you are done, you may Disconnect or Log Off:
      • Disconnect: Just like the Windows Desktop on the thin clients, you may disconnect from your desktop session but keep the programs running. Use this is you want to return later to finish your work. To disconnect, click the 'x' in the upper right-hand corner of the Remote Desktop Connection bar.
      • Log Off: When you are completely finished, you should log off. To log off, click your name in the upper right-hand corner of the screen and select "Quit..."

    From another computer on the CSU network

      Windows

      Follow the same instructions in the "From a Thin Client or Lab PC" section, above.

      Mac OS
      1. Download and install the Microsoft Remote Desktop Connection Client for Mac.
      2. Open Remote Desktop Connection from your dock or under the Applications menu on the Finder.
      3. Continue with the instructions in the "From a Thin Client or Lab PC" section, above.
      Linux
      1. Install a remote desktop package such as rdesktop.
      2. Continue with the instructions in the "From a Thin Client or Lab PC" section, above.
      Commodore 64
      1. Obtain a Hyperterminal emulator such as HyperTerminal Alternatives.
      2. Obtain a IDE64-DUART serial card and install it in your Commodore 64.
      3. Modify the IDE64-DUART to set up an interrupt that scans an incoming port, and send the result into a keyboard buffer.
        • Note: Be sure the input is bi-directional.
        • You will likely want to map CTRL-C to RunStop.
        • If a BRK is executed locally, you may wish to respond by changing the BRK vector to preserver the vector table.
      4. You may need to obtain a BBS Server program to provide bridging between the Commodore and the modern Internet. This program has modem and RS232 options.
      5. Use the Hyperterminal emulator to connect to the appropriate IP address.
        • If WinSock does not see the connection, you may need to implement a 5 minute timeout.

    From your personal computer

    1. Use OpenVPN to connect to the Engineering network.
    2. Continue with the instructions in "From another computer on the CSU network", above.

Connect with NX Client

    From your personal computer

    1. Download NoMachine NX Client 3.5.0-7. (For your convenience, the installation files are located at S:\Applications\NX Client) Please note that currently only versions 3.5.0-7 or 3.5.0-9 work with our linux servers.
    2. Open NX Client for Windows from the Start Menu. (Tip: Click the Windows button and type 'nx'. When you see the program name, click on it.
    3. The NX Connection Wizard will start. Click Next.
    4. For Session, type a friendly name such as 'linux8'. This name can be whatever you want.
    5. For Host, type the full hostname of the Linux workstation to which you want to connect, e.g., linux1.engr.colostate.edu. (Linux workstations are linux1 - linux8.)
    6. Ensure the port is listed as 22.
    7. Move the slider to LAN and click Next.
    8. Select UNIX and GNOME for the first two settings. Click Next.
    9. Uncheck 'Create shortcut on desktop', and check 'Show the Advanced Configuration Dialog'. Click Finish.
    10. On the Advanced Configuration dialog, click on the Key button. A window will pop up that will have a default key. Erase the existing key and replace it with the appropriate key, based on the machine you are connecting to. (See below for keys.)
    11. Click Save to save the key settings, then click Save again on the dialog to save your settings for that server. Click OK.
    12. The Nomachine login screen will open. Enter your Engineering login name and password, then click Login.
    13. If a dialog box appears asking about the authenticity of the host, answer Yes.
    14. You will see the desktop of the Linux server. Perform your work on the Linux server as necessary, but remember to log out of the Linux server session.

    Server Keys for NX Client

    Please click here to receive the server keys for the Linux workstations.

Connect with SSH (command-line only)

    From another ENS server

    • OpenSSH is installed by default on the ENS Linux and Solaris systems.
    • Open a terminal window and type:
      ssh machine_name
    • Log in with your Engineering user name and password.

    From Windows

    • Download and install PuTTY. NOTE: PuTTY is installed on the Windows computers in the ENS labs.
    • Open PuTTY from the Start Menu.
    • In the box labled "Host Name (or IP address)", type the host name of the machine you want and click "Open" to connect.
    • Log in with your Engineering user name and password.

    From Linux

    • Download and install OpenSSH, if it is not already installed on your system.
    • Open a terminal window and type:
      ssh machine_name.engr.colostate.edu
    • Log in with your Engineering user name and password.

    From Mac OS X

    • OS X comes with SSH preinstalled. See your system manuals for configuration directions.
    • Run /Applications/Utilities/Terminal to start xterm. This should bring up an xterm window.
    • At the prompt in the xterm, connect to a computer server by typing:
      ssh username@machine_name.engr.colostate.edu
    • Log in with your Engineering password.

Connect with X-forwarding

"X" is a window system (often referred to as the X Window System), which is used on many Linux machines. Under this system, it is possible to easily run programs remotely and make them appear as if they were run on the local machine.

    Windows (method 1)

    • Download and install Xming
    • Download and install PuTTY
    • Start PuTTY.
    • Under "Connection," expand SSH and click on X11. Check "Enable X11 forwarding."
    • Go to the section Session at the top left and under saved sessions, click on "Default Settings" and click save. This will save the setting for next time.
    • Start Xming (this will put a "X" icon in the taskbar), use Putty to ssh into the server that you would like.
    • Log in with your Engineering user name and password.
    • Once you are connected, check that applications will open on your computer by typing xclock. This should display a small analog clock.
    • Note: You do not need to have Xming running before you start PuTTY. You can start PuTTY and then start Xming.

    Windows (method 2)

    • Download and Install cygwin. Here are some instructions.
    • Double-click on the cygwin icon (this opens up a terminal window, where you have a more Unix-like command-line environment within Windows)
    • Type startxwin.bat (this will open up another terminal window with all the X display information already configured by cygwin)
    • In this new terminal window, type
      ssh -Y username@machine_name.engr.colostate.edu
    • Log in with your Engineering user name and password.
    • You can now run the application of your choice.

    Linux or Solaris

    • Open up a terminal window and type:
      ssh -XC machine_name.engr.colostate.edu
    • Log in with your Engineering user name and password.

    Mac OS X

    In order to run programs with X-forwarding on Macintosh OS X, you need SSH (which is installed by default) and X11 for Mac OS X, which is freely available.

    • Download and install Xquartz or X11.
    • Run /Applications/Utilities/X11 to start X11. This should bring up an xterm window.
    • At the prompt in the xterm window, connect to a compute server by typing:
      ssh -X username@machine_name.engr.colostate.edu
      or, if the -X gives you problems
      ssh -Y username@machine_name.engr.colostate.edu
      Note: The -X enables X-forwarding. Sometimes, you might need to use -Y instead, which enables trusted X-forwarding.
    • Run the application you wish to use from the command prompt.
 
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This document last modified Monday August 25, 2014


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